Join

Enter Details

Comment on stories, receive email newsletters & alerts.

@
This is your permanent identity for Business Insider Australia
Your email must be valid for account activation
Minimum of 8 standard keyboard characters

Subscribe

Email newsletters but will contain a brief summary of our top stories and news alerts.

Forgotten Password

Enter Details


Back to log in

The Borussia Dortmund bus attack may have been an attempt to manipulate the markets

The attack that injured one BVB Borussia Dortmund player and led to a Champions League game being postponed earlier in April looks to have been an attempt to manipulate the stock market and lead to a big profit for the alleged perpetrator.

On Friday German police arrested a man on suspicion of planting the explosives that injured Spanish defender Marc Bartra on April 11, accusing him of attempted murder, inflicting serious bodily harm and causing an explosion.

The bus of the BVB Borussia Dortmund football team was struck by three explosions. Two people were injured in the explosions: Bartra and a police officer who was near the bus at the time of the attack.

The suspect, a 28-year-old man identified as Sergei V by prosecutors, had reportedly bought options on Borussia Dortmund’s stock worth roughly €78,000 (£65,000; $US83,600).

The purchase of 15,000 put options — which essentially allow individuals to sell their stock at a pre-determined price — would have allowed him to make a substantial profit in the event of a big drop in Dortmund’s share following the bombing.

“If the shares of Borussia Dortmund had fallen massively, the profit would have been several times the initial investment,” the prosecutor’s office said, according to a Reuters report. The office added that if any players had been seriously injured or even killed, that would have been a realistic option.

Dortmund shares did slip the day after the attack, but dropped only 2.5%.

Soon after the attack, German police arrested one suspect with what were described as “Islamic links” after a letter was found close to the site of the bombings which started:
“In the name of Allah, the Gracious, the Merciful,” and claimed responsibility for the attack.

The letter referred to the attack on the Berlin Christmas market and claimed that German forces are involved in the killing of Muslims in the Islamic State’s caliphate.

Athletes and celebrities in “Germany and other crusader nations” are therefore on a “death list of the Islamic State,” the unsigned, typed letter claimed.

More from Business Insider UK:

NOW WATCH: Timeline of a crisis: How United’s passenger-bumping debacle unfolded

NOW WATCH: Money & Markets videos

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.