A cult-favourite sock startup said it was forced to turn off its phone line after being flooded with complaints of incomplete or disappearing orders

BombasBombas has been flooded with complaints this holiday season.
  • Bombas, a cult-favourite sock startup, is being flooded with complaints of incomplete or missing orders.
  • The startup told Business Insider it was forced to turn off its phone line and its live-chat service to try to answer an “overwhelming number of customer messages” about problems with orders.
  • Bombas said a fulfillment partner’s technology-related issues were to blame for incomplete and missing orders.
  • The startup is offering full refunds and gift cards to affected shoppers.
  • “At the end of the day, we can admit when we’ve made a mistake and are willing to do whatever it takes to gain our customers’ trust back and ensure their satisfaction, even if it means a loss of profit for our company,” Bombas CEO and cofounder Dave Heath said in a statement to Business Insider.

Bombas, a sock startup that took the internet by storm, is facing dozens of complaints of incomplete or missing orders this holiday season.

The number of complaints recently ballooned so much that the company was forced to turn off its phone line and its live-chat service, it said.

On Monday, Bombas’ CEO and cofounder, Dave Heath, told Business Insider the company was offering full refunds and gift cards to affected customers, “even if it means a loss of profit for our company.”

The startup, founded in 2013, has been celebrated for its comfortable socks and socially conscious mission. For every pair of socks sold, Bombas donates a pair to someone in need.

While Bombas has previously dealt with massive spikes in orders with minimal issues, dozens of customers have complained in December that the company failed to deliver their complete order.

According to Bombas, a fulfillment partner encountered technology-related issues that caused significant problems.

Bombas’ social-media pages have been flooded with complaints of incorrect or missing orders and about a lack of response.

https://twitter.com/guidetogrowing/status/1074300383231729664?ref_src=twsrc^tfw

Jack Tilpert ordered from Bombas for the first time on December 6, opting for three-to-five-day shipping. As of Monday – 11 days later – the socks still hadn’t arrived.

Tilpert told Business Insider he had emailed Bombas 10 times, called the company, and posted on Facebook and Instagram.

“I haven’t gotten any response to any of my messages,” Tilpert said. “Very frustrating.”


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A common complaint from customers is that they received only part of their order, something that is especially problematic because Bombas socks cost more than many competitors; a pair of Bombas ankle socks costs $US12, a similar price as a six-pack of socks from Target.

Many customers said the company failed to respond to their attempts to contact it about issues.

https://twitter.com/AinDC/status/1074364375664902144?ref_src=twsrc^tfw

Bombas’ customer-service phone number was unreachable for some because of heavy traffic on Sunday.

Heath said in a statement to Business Insider that every person in the company had been “working around the clock” to get caught up and address issues.

“This holiday season, due to a number of unanticipated technology-related issues with our fulfillment partner, we received an overwhelming number of customer messages,” Heath said. “Unfortunately, it’s been [taking] us longer than usual to respond to these customers, and and as a result we had to turn off our phones and live chat so we could focus on responding to emails, which is our most used support channel.”

Bombas is offering a full refund and gift card to anyone affected by the issues, saying customers can email [email protected] Bombas has pledged to resolve problems within 24 hours.

“At the end of the day, we can admit when we’ve made a mistake and are willing to do whatever it takes to gain our customers’ trust back and ensure their satisfaction, even if it means a loss of profit for our company,” Heath said. “We appreciate the patience and support of all of our customers and know that we would not have been able to donate more than 10 million pairs of socks without them.”

Heath emphasised that “giving back to the community and a positive customer experience are the core pillars of our business.” Bombas says on its website that it upholds a “no matter what, no questions asked, no holds barred, no ifs, no ands, no buts” happiness guarantee.

“If you have a problem, we will solve it. Refund it. Send you new socks. Whatever it takes,” the website says.

In January, Heath told Business Insider that the company had been profitable since 2016 and brought in “just under $US50 million” in revenue in 2017. Heath also said Bombas would scale its donations alongside its sales growth.

Email [email protected] if you have a story to share about Bombas or any other holiday shopping disappointment.

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