A Boeing executive reportedly said the company is open to a new name for the embattled 737 Max, which remains grounded worldwide after 2 deadly crashes

ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty ImagesBoeing Chief Financial Officer Greg Smith addresses a ‘Boeing Business Update’ press conference on the first day of the International Paris Air Show on June 17, 2019 at Le Bourget Airport, near Paris.
  • Boeing isn’t ruling out the possibility of a name change for its embattled 737 Max jet
  • “We’re committed to doing what we need to do to restore it. If that means changing the brand to restore it, then we’ll address that,” the company’s CFO said at the Paris Air Show, according to Bloomberg.
  • President Donald Trump previously suggested a name change in April.
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Boeing will reportedly consider any and all options to repair the reputation of its 737 Max jet, which has been grounded for more than three months following a second deadly crash.

“We’re committed to doing what we need to do to restore it. If that means changing the brand to restore it, then we’ll address that,” Greg Smith, the company’s chief financial officer, told Bloomberg News at the Paris Air Show on Monday. “If it doesn’t, we’ll address whatever is a high priority.”

The company has made no public statements about future plans for the plane model, other than the repeated apologies to victim’s families and pledges to get the jet re-certified to fly.

However, there’s still no end in sight to the plane’s grounding. Boeing has been working with the US’s Federal Aviation Administration to find a fix for the faulty sensor system that’s suspected to be at the root of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Air crashes in recent months, but the plane could be out of service until December, an FAA official said this month.

A name change would fall in line with a solution that was suggested by President Donald Trump. In April, Trump said if he were Boeing, he would “FIX the Boeing 737 MAX, add some additional great features, & REBRAND the plane with a new name.”


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