A Kansas family found a 6-foot boa constrictor slithering inside their living room couch, and people are offering to adopt it

Courtesy of Butler County Fire District #3Deputy fire chief Melvin Linot and firefighter Brandon Kolter with the boa constrictor.
    • A family in Rose Hill, Kansas, found a 6-foot-long boa constrictor in their couch.
    • The Rose Hill Police Department asked firefighters at Butler County Fire District #3 to help remove it.
    • The fire department posted a photo to its Facebook page, and people are offering to adopt the snake.
    • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

It was a typical Monday morning for Butler County Fire District #3 in Rose Hill, Kansas. Then they received an unusual call.

A family had found a 6-foot-long boa constrictor slithering inside their living room couch. Could they help the Rose Hill Police Department remove it?

Boa constrictors are non-venomous snakes, but they do pose a danger to humans. Their bites have sent people to the hospital, and they kill their prey by cutting off blood circulation to the brain. The Humane Society documented 17 constrictor snake-related deaths in the US from 1978 to 2012.

Deputy fire chief Melvin Linot and firefighter Brandon Kolter arrived on the scene, safely removed the boa constrictor, and posted a photo to their Facebook page. The snake then swiftly captured the hearts of Facebook users, several of whom offered to adopt the lost creature.

“I am not missing any snakes, but if that beauty needs a home I would be happy to take the little feller in and give it a good home,” one commenter wrote.

“I will take that beautiful baby if no one claims it,” another person wrote.

“If nobody claims it I will absolutely adopt it!” wrote another.

Anyone who has information about the snake can call the Butler County Fire District at 316-776-0401. And while the adoption offers are heartwarming, the Humane Society discourages people from keeping constrictive snakes as pets, saying that they’re “wild animals who prefer to be left undisturbed in their natural habitat.”

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