The best current TV show on each network — from ABC to FX to Netflix

AMC‘Better Call Saul’

In today’s crowded TV landscape, there are more outlets for great shows than ever before.

TV networks and streaming services are always on the hunt for the next great series, and the competition among them has enhanced not only the breadth, but also the quality of their offerings.

To figure out which current shows are worth watching across all outlets, we turned to the reviews aggregator Rotten Tomatoes to select the most critically acclaimed scripted show that each network and service is currently producing (we made some exceptions for shows that just ended this year).

We excluded children’s shows, talk shows, and docuseries, and we only selected from networks with scripted shows that had enough reviews to receive a “Fresh” designation. We broke any ties with the Rotten Tomatoes audience score.

Here is the best current TV show on each network, according to critics:


ABC: “Speechless”

ABC/Kelsey McNeal

Critic score: 91%

Summary: “Andre and Rainbow want to give their kids the best-but they’re realising that childhood is much different these days.”

What critics said: “While more tired than it’s ever felt, is still one of TV’s best family comedies, mixing the sort of lighthearted family stories that are the centre of this subgenre with more thoughtful and probing explorations of black life in America.” – Vox (season 5)


Adult Swim: “Rick and Morty”

Critic score: 97%

Summary: “Rick and Morty is a show about a sociopathic scientist who drags his unintelligent grandson on insanely dangerous adventures across the universe.”

What critics said: “Rick and Morty has always been one of wildest shows on TV. It’s time to admit that it’s also one of the best.” – Vulture (season 3)


Amazon: “Fleabag”

Amazon

Critic score: 100%

Summary: “Joyful, bleak, poignant and sucker-punch funny, the original cast is joined by a car-crash of new characters as we delve further into the world of Fleabag. With hope and faith at the core of Season Two, our heroine finds herself in the midst of a battle she is determined to win: Fleabag Vs God.”

What critics said: “In an entertainment landscape that rarely grants women characters the range to be challenging, Fleabag’s commitment to exploring the sisters’ anxieties about (and slow progress toward) one another is a breath of fresh air.” – The Atlantic (season 2)


AMC: “Better Call Saul”

Ursula Coyote/AMC

Critic score: 97%

Summary:“In the wake of his loss, Jimmy takes steps into the criminal world that will put his future as a lawyer – and his relationship with Kim – in jeopardy.” (season 4)

What critics said: “It’s fascinating to watch all of this emotional, character-driven drama unfold against a backdrop of a battle for power in the drug trade in New Mexico… Nothing feels perfunctory or thrown away on this show, even the smallest details.” – RogerEbert.com (season 4)


BBC America: “Killing Eve”

BBC America

Critic score: 94%

Summary:“Killing Eve is the story of two women, bound by a mutual obsession and one brutal act: Eve, an MI6 operative, and Villanelle, the beautiful, psychopathic assassin that she has been tasked to find.”

What critics said: “If Eve is our frayed tether to reality, Villanelle embodies the entitled, otherworldly glamour of both being in her line of work and taking pride in it.” – Slate (season 2)


BET: “Boomerang”

BET

Critic score: 100%

Summary:“Fuelled by romance, friendship, gender politics, love and of course, sex, this half-hour serialized comedy continues the story from the same-named 1992 American romantic comedy film, in which a successful executive finds out his boss is a bigger deviant than he is. The updated version follows the lives of Jacqueline Boyer’s son, Bryson, and Marcus and Angela Graham’s daughter, Simone, as they try to step out of their parents’ shadows and create their own legacies. Viewers see a group of childhood friends as adults who are looking to build careers as marketing professionals while navigating their feelings for one another.”

What critics said: “The epitome of Millennial cool – stylish and ambitious, but not willing to be defined in any traditional way.” – Indiewire (season 1)


CBS: “Elementary”

Michael Parmelee//CBS

Critic score: 96%

Summary:“Elementary stars Jonny Lee Miller as Detective Sherlock Holmes and Lucy Liu as Dr. Joan Watson in a modern-day drama about a crime-solving duo that cracks the NYPD’s most impossible cases.”

What critics said: “The best moments of this show are still the small things.” – AV Club (season 7)


CBS All Access: “The Good Fight”

CBS

Critic score: 96%

Summary:“The world went crazy in The Good Fight’s second season, and now, in Season 3, the resistance does. Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) tries to figure out whether you can resist a crazy administration without going crazy yourself, while Adrian Boseman (Delroy Lindo) and Liz Reddick-Lawrence (Audra McDonald) struggle with a new post-factual world where the lawyer who tells the best story triumphs over the lawyer with the best facts.”

What critics said: “Inventively shot, almost entirely indoors, The Good Fight is zingily scripted and brilliantly acted all round and it takes all kinds of risks.” –London Evening Standard (season 3)


Cinemax: “Jett”

Cinemax

Critic score: 93%

Summary: “Jett stars Carla Gugino as world-class thief Daisy ‘Jett’ Kowalski. Fresh out of prison, she is forced back into doing what she does best, and a cast of morally ambivalent, dangerous and eccentric criminals, from budding femme fatales to compromised law enforcers, are determined to exploit her skills for their own ends.”

What critics said: “Jett invites everybody to vicariously revel in the story’s sensual power and how the title character moves with it, channels it.” – Salon (season 1)


Comedy Central: “Broad City”

YouTube/Comedy Central

Critic score: 99%

Summary:“Created by UCB alums Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer, Broad City is an odd-couple comedy about two best friends navigating life in New York City. Abbi and Ilana are broke and flawed, and they don’t shy away from the sticky situations NYC throws at them – they dive right into the muck. No matter how bad it gets, these broads are always down to tackle whatever hits them.”

What critics said: “Broad City is in some ways a studiously small show: Its focus, over its five remarkable seasons, has been the wacky adventures and, more often, the wacky misadventures of its two protagonists … The pair’s friendship is total, and totalizing.” – The Atlantic (season 5)


The CW: “Jane the Virgin”

‘Jane the Virgin’/The CW

Critic score: 100%

Summary:“A young, devout Catholic woman discovers that she was accidentally artificially inseminated.”

What critics said: “The series never loses sight of the three women at its centre.” – Refinery29 (season 5)


Fox: “9-1-1”

Fox

Critic score: 94%

Summary:“Creators Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk and Tim Minear reimagine the procedural drama with 9-1-1, exploring the high-pressure experiences of police officers, firefighters and dispatchers who are thrust into the most frightening, shocking and heart-stopping situations.”

What critics said: “Our first responders are about to get very, very busy.” – Entertainment Weekly (season 2)


FX: “Atlanta”

Matthias Clamer/FX

Critic score: 97%

Summary:“Two cousins work through the Atlanta music scene in order to better their lives and the lives of their families. Donald Glover serves as Executive Producer, along with Paul Simms, Dianne McGunigle and Stephen Glover.”

What critics said: “Glover has conceptualized ‘Atlanta’ so that he can do with it whatever he wants; he’s not bound by traditional sitcom rules or limitations. That’s the fun of it. It’s his ride, and where he goes is anyone’s guess. But it will be worth the trip.” – Detroit News


HBO: “Insecure”

HBO

Critic score: 97%

Summary: “Creator Issa Rae (The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl) stars as Issa Dee, who struggles to navigate the tricky professional and personal terrain of Los Angeles along with her best friend Molly (Yvonne Orji).”

What critics said: “Insecure’s willingness to follow the narrative arc of a beloved character and allow them to fade into the background is a move that many shows do not have the confidence to make.” – Slate (season 3)


Hulu: “Harlots”

Hulu

Critic score: 98%

Summary: “Margaret Wells struggles to reconcile her roles as brothel owner and mother to daughters Charlotte and Lucy. When her business comes under attack from Lydia Quigley, a rival madam with a ruthless streak, Margaret must fight back even if it means losing her family and possibly her life.”

What critics said: “In a world of arson, hangings, incest, bare-knuckle boxing, molly houses and murderous cults, the fact that Harlots still manages to keep its viewers on their toes is a true testament to its greatness.” – Guardian (season 3)


IFC: “Brockmire”

IFC

Critic score: 98%

Summary:“Attempting to rebuild his life while navigating his new sobriety, Brockmire (Hank Azaria) moves to Florida where he calls MLB Spring Training games for Oakland alongside former softball star Gabby Taylor (Tawny Newsome).”

What critics said: “It’s amazing that Brockmire can go to such a sad, lovely, introspective place amid all the crude (if creative) jokes about sex, booze and inside-actual-baseball references.” – Rolling Stone (season 3)


NBC: “Brooklyn Nine-Nine”

Fox

Critic score: 97%

Summary:“SNL alum Andy Samberg and Emmy winner Andre Braugher lead this diverse, critically acclaimed ensemble that solves crimes like only they can – with tons of humour and the heart to match.”

What critics said: “Its specialty is scoring laughs without taking the shortcut of humiliation.” – New Yorker (season 6)


Netflix: “Master of None”

Netflix

Critic score: 100%

Summary:“Dev tries to jump-start his acting career and elevate his dating game with help from his eclectic group of friends in this award-winning series.”

What critics said: “Master of None isn’t here to propagate myths. It’s striving to find truth. And what’s uncovered in Season 2 is a lot like the life Ansari and Yang expertly recreate: surprising, enriching, and oh so divine.” –Indiewire (season 2)


Showtime: “Shameless”

Showtime

Critic score: 90%

Summary:“Oscar-nominated William H. Macy and Emmy Rossum star in this fiercely engaging and fearlessly twisted series. Chicagoan Frank Gallagher is the proud single dad of six smart, industrious, independent kids, who without him would be…perhaps better off. When Frank’s not at the bar spending what little money they have, he’s passed out on the floor. But the kids have found ways to grow up in spite of him. They may not be like any family you know, but they make no apologies for being exactly who they are.”

What critics said: “Each character seems to go two steps forward and two steps back. Some might accuse this of being repetitive, but if you accept the series’ nihilistic nature, it is just the show’s perception of reality.” – Den of Geek (season 9)


Starz: “Counterpart”

Starz

Critic score: 100%

Summary: “Academy Award Winner J.K. Simmons plays Howard Silk, a cog of a Berlin-based United Nations spy agency. Howard is thrust into a shadow world of intrigue and danger, where the only man he can trust is ‘Prime.'”

What critics said: “Beyond its artfully chilly atmosphere and its surprisingly plausible and suspenseful narrative, the main attraction in Season 2 remains J.K. Simmons’s crafty, quiet portrayal of the two spies.” – New York Times (season 2)


Sundance Now: “State of the Union”

Sundance

Critic score: 100%

Summary: “From the brilliant mind of Nick Hornby (Brooklyn, Fever Pitch) comes a series of ten ten-minute episodes about contemporary relationships. Each episode is set in a pub immediately before Tom (Chris O’Dowd) and Louise (Rosamund Pike) have their weekly marital therapy session.”

What critics said: “State of the Union is a sketch of a mid-life marriage in crisis. It doesn’t need to be anything else, and perhaps this is where the short form is working in its favour.” – Slant Magazine


Syfy: “The Magicians”

Syfy

Critic score: 85%

Summary:“Based upon Lev Grossman’s best-selling books, The Magicians centres around Brakebills University, a secret institution specializing in magic. There, amidst an unorthodox education of spellcasting, a group of twenty-something friends soon discover that a magical fantasy world they read about as children is all too real- and poses grave danger to humanity.”

What critics said: “This is a show in which inexplicably good-looking people run around trying to kill demons and party with gods, but never at the expense of some Serious Storytelling.” – Obsever (season 4)


TBS: “Search Party”

TBS

Critic score: 98%

Summary:“Five self-absorbed 20-somethings are in danger as they deal with the disastrous consequences of tracking down a missing classmate.”

What critics said: “The show is at its best when it elevates mundane problems and mistakes into hugely dramatic moments, making the most of its cultural satire that mirrors our own worst self-interested impulses.” – Collider(season 2)


TNT: “Claws”

TNT

Critic score: 90%

Summary:“Claws follows five diverse and treacherous manicurists, good women caught in bad places with worse men.”

What critics said: “The story of an all-female salon crew caught up with the Dixie mafia has landed on the perfect metaphor for embracing its own excesses.” – The Ringer (season 3)


USA: “Mr. Robot”

USA

Critic score: 93%

Summary:“The series follows Elliot Alderson (Rami Malek), a cyber-security engineer who became involved in the underground hacker group fsociety after being recruited by their mysterious leader (Christian Slater), who he later discovered to be the projection of his dead father.”

What critics said: “Season 3 of Mr. Robot is a masterpiece, ballasting the global ambitions of season 2 while sharpening back to the meticulous build of season 1.” – Entertainment Weekly(season 3)

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