Movies with such intense twists and turns that you'll have to watch them more than once

CJ Entertainment‘Parasite’ is filled with shocking moments and twists.
  • Insider rounded up 17 thrillers, dramas, and horror classics that should be viewed at least twice if you want to really appreciate and understand them.
  • Movies like “Psycho” (1960) and “Gone Girl” (2014) have twists that will leave you wanting to watch the movie again.
  • “Parasite” (2019) and “Get Out” (2016) are both intense thrillers that warrant a second viewing.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Some movies have such jaw-dropping conclusions or twists that they inspire an instant rewatch.

From “Parasite” (2019) to “Get Out” (2016), here are 17 films that deserve a second look. Don’t worry – there are no spoilers ahead.


“Parasite” (2019) is a tightly-wound suspense thriller that doubles as a commentary on class.

Neon/CJ EntertainmentThe ram-don scene in ‘Parasite.’

In Bong Joon-ho’s spellbinding South Korean drama “Parasite,” young Ki-woo (Choi Woo-shik) and his family – Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho), Chung-sook (Jang Hye-jin), and Ki-jung (Park So-dam) – con a wealthy household into employing them all in an effort to escape a life of poverty.

The film, which won the Academy Award for best picture in 2020, has a notable shift in tone at the halfway mark.

This unexpected twist, coupled with Joon-ho’s carefully layered dialogue and cinematography, promptly demands a rewatch from viewers who want to fully absorb the thrilling social satire.


“Psycho” (1960) is required viewing for fans of horror and mystery.

Universal Pictures‘Psycho’ is a classic Alfred Hitchcock film.

Alfred Hitchcock’s classic horror “Psycho” centres on a young woman named Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) as she skips town with her employer’s money. When she makes a pit stop at a secluded motel, Marion is unsettled by the owner, a taxidermy enthusiast named Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins).

Due to critical and popular success, “Psycho” had a massive impact on film and introduced a now-infamous villain to the world of psychological horror.

“Psycho” has a third-act twist that changes the way you see the characters, and repeated screenings can help viewers fully grasp the intricacies of the early slasher flick.


“Moon” (2009) is a puzzling space-horror set on the moon.

Sony Pictures Classics‘Moon’ was directed by Duncan Jones.

In the science-fiction film “Moon,” astronaut Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) approaches the end of his three-year mission on the far reaches of the moon with only an artificial robot as his companion.

While harvesting fuel from the soil, Sam faces communication issues with his home base and begins to question if he’ll ever actually leave his lunar post.

Pulling inspiration from science-fiction favourites like “Alien” (1979) and “Outland” (1981), director Duncan Jones carefully crafted a unique space-horror about seclusion and identity.

An early reveal acts as a catalyst for the rest of the film, building to an emotional climax that’s worth viewing multiple times.


“Get Out” (2016) is a psychological horror film brimming with social commentary.

Universal StudiosDaniel Kaluuya in ‘Get Out’

Photographer Chris Washington (Daniel Kaluuya) is apprehensive enough when his girlfriend Rose Armitage (Allison Williams) begs him to go upstate and meet her parents (Bradley Whitford and Catherine Keener), but his anxiety turns to horror as he learns a disturbing secret about her family.

Critics and viewers alike were floored by Jordan Peele’s horror debut, praising his talents as both a writer and director.

From subtle foreshadowing to complex themes on racial relations in America, “Get Out” deserves multiple viewings and post-film discussions.


“The Prestige” (2006) is a thriller about rival magicians in 19th-century London.

Francois Duhamel/Touchstone Pictures‘The Prestige’ is based on a novel.

Based on a novel by Christopher Priest, “The Prestige” is a thriller that follows the rivalry between two magicians – Robert Angier (Hugh Jackman) and Alfred Borden (Christian Bale) – as their drastic measures edge them closer to a deadly conclusion.

Christopher Nolan’s psychological thriller depicts how quickly competition can transform into obsession, as the two magicians continue to up the stakes of their tricks.

Filled with scenes that implement sleight of hand and misdirection, the film itself is its own kind of magic trick – and the final reveal encourages an immediate rewatch.


In “The Sixth Sense” (1999), a psychologist helps a boy who communicates with the dead.

Buena Vista Pictures‘The Sixth Sense’ is essential watching for those who enjoy thrillers.

In the supernatural thriller “The Sixth Sense,” child psychologist Malcolm Crowe (Bruce Willis) is enlisted to help a young boy named Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment), who insists that he can see and speak to the dead.

Director M. Night Shyamalan is famous for using plot twists in his movies, and the reveal in “The Sixth Sense” is perhaps one of the most well-known endings in his filmography.

The bone-chilling finale makes viewers rethink everything they have seen up until that point as Shyamalan uses narrative manipulation, unspoken dialogue, and creative shots to craft a memorable, and quotable, thriller.


“Primer” (2004) is a cult-classic science-fiction film.

ThinkFilm‘Primer’ is meant to be seen more than once.

In the science-fiction movie “Primer,” two engineers Aaron – (Shane Carruth) and Abe (David Sullivan) – collaborate daily on tech projects out of Aaron’s garage, only for them to accidentally stumble upon the invention of time travel.

Known for its low-budget feel and complex technical dialogue, “Primer” eventually reached cult-classic status in the years after its initial release.

Filled with time-travel logic and complex mathematics, “Primer” typically requires multiple screenings to be fully understood by viewers.


“Us” (2019) is a horror film about a family that faces off with their doppelgängers.

Universal Pictures‘Us’ is another Jordan Peele film.

In the horror flick “Us,” Adelaide (Lupita Nyong’o) is filled with an unexplainable dread before going on vacation with her husband, Gabe (Winston Duke), and their kids, Zora (Shahadi Wright Joseph) and Jason (Evan Alex).

But worry quickly turns to fear as a family who looks identical to them arrives on their doorstep and holds them captive.

After tackling more nuanced themes in the psychological thriller “Get Out,” Peele set out to make a full-out horror film with “Us.”

By creating a rich mythology behind the film’s twist and setting the stakes so high that the finale seemingly impacts the entire globe, Peele went big with his sophomore effort and the resulting movie deserves a second look.


In “Memento” (2000) a man looks for revenge without being able to rely on his memory.

Newmarket Films‘Memento’ is primarily told in reverse.

In Nolan’s revenge thriller “Memento,” Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) looks for the man who murdered his late wife, but an injury prevents him from creating new memories.

Unable to trust other people, Leonard turns to notes, photographs, and tattoos to find his wife’s killer.

Nolan loves to toy with narration and audience expectation, but nowhere is that more apparent than in “Memento,” which is told largely in reverse.

Because the narrative is fragmented and out of order, “Memento” ages well with multiple viewings and reveals new hidden clues each time.


An office worker invites chaos and violence into his life in “Fight Club” (1999).

Fox 2000 PicturesEdward Norton and Brad Pitt in ‘Fight Club.’

Based on the book by Chuck Palahniuk, the thriller “Fight Club,” is about an unnamed office worker (Edward Norton) who seeks a break from monotony when he befriends soap salesman Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) and joins an underground fight club.

David Fincher sets the film up for a stomach-punch of a plot twist using unreliable narration, insomnia-driven hallucinations, visual cues, and foreshadowing.

“Fight Club” is a fun thrill ride from the first watch, but repeat viewings can lend added appreciation to the chaotic, visually-charged flick.


“Shutter Island” (2010) is a neo-noir mystery set on a secluded island.

ParamountMark Ruffalo and Leonardo DiCaprio in ‘Shutter Island.’

In Martin Scorsese’s neo-noir thriller “Shutter Island,” US Marshal Teddy Daniels (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his partner, Chuck Aule (Mark Ruffalo), travel to a secluded island to investigate the disappearance of a patient at a high-security asylum.

Based on the bestseller by Dennis Lehane, the film adaptation benefits from Scorsese’s accomplished directing style, a haunting score, and the cast’s talented acting performances.

But it’s the central mystery and ultimate conclusion that make viewers want to go back and look for newfound clues on a second watch.


“2001: A Space Odyssey” (1968) is an influential science-fiction film set on a spaceship.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ is a classic for a reason.

Set in an alternate future, the film follows a group of five astronauts and a hyper-intelligent computer (voiced by Douglas Rain) as they set off on a space mission across the galaxy.

As they all travel toward Jupiter, ship commander Dr. Dave Bowman (Keir Dullea) slowly learns about the truth behind their mission.

A pioneering film in terms of technology and special effects, Stanley Kubrick’s science-fiction film has been dissected and discussed throughout the decades by viewers and critics alike.

Kubrick uses an unconventional soundtrack and minimal dialogue to build tension towards his epic climax, which never gets old no matter how many times it’s viewed.


“Oldboy” (2003) is a revenge thriller about a man who is set free after 15 years of captvitiy.

CJ Entertainment‘Oldboy’ is a revenge thriller.

Based on a Japanese manga of the same name, Park Chan-wook’s “Oldboy” is an action thriller that centres on Oh Dae-Su (Choi Min-sik), a man who has been imprisoned for 15 years.

When he’s suddenly released, Dae-Su is given a surprising opportunity to kill his jailor, whose identity remains unknown.

Violent and action-driven, “Oldboy” is a propulsive thrill ride full of fight choreography and scenes that leave viewers on the edge of their seats.

A revenge thriller on the surface, “Oldboy” is more than what meets the eye, especially when it comes to a squirm-inducing twist.


In the thriller “Gone Girl” (2014) a man is investigated for his wife’s disappearance.

20th Century Fox‘Gone Girl’ is based on a best-selling book.

In David Fincher’s psychological thriller “Gone Girl,” seemingly perfect husband Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) is blindsided when his wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) vanishes and investigators pin him as the prime suspect in her disappearance.

Based on the bestseller by Gillian Flynn – who also penned the film adaptation – “Gone Girl” was praised for its expert storytelling and well-crafted cinematography.

Because the film uses unreliable narration and multiple protagonists, a second viewing drastically shifts viewers’ perception of the main leads.


“Mulholland Drive” (2001) is a neo-noir thriller about a woman looking for her identity.

Universal Pictures‘Mulholland Drive’ is a neo-noir thriller.

In David Lynch’s neo-noir thriller “Mulholland Drive,” Naomi Watts stars as Betty Elms, an aspiring actress who meets an amnesiac named Rita (Laura Elena Harring) right after she makes the move to Los Angeles. Upon befriending Rita, Betty offers to help Rita discover her true identity.

Directed with Lynch’s singular and unique style, “Mulholland Drive” stands out in the psychological thriller genre as a memorable and haunting film.

Lynch purposefully left room for interpretation and double meanings that easily lend themselves to repeat watches and post-film discussions.


“Donnie Darko” (2001) is a psychological thriller about a teenager who suffers from delusions.

‘Donnie Darko’Jake Gyllenhaal in ‘Donnie Darko.’

In the science-fiction thriller “Donnie Darko,” troubled teenager Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) is haunted by hallucinations of a man in a rabbit suit. During a sleepwalking spell, the man tells Donnie that he only has a month before the end of the world.

With its unique dialogue, references to time travel, and an emphasis on mental health, “Donnie Darko” has spurred multiple interpretations since its release.

Viewers have been reaching for the rewind button for years to fully grasp the cult film’s paradoxical ending.


A trained team manipulates dreams in “Inception” (2010).

Warner Bros. PicturesLeonardo DiCaprio in the dream-hacking movie ‘Inception.’

In Nolan’s science-fiction heist film “Inception,” Cobb (DiCaprio) tries to wipe out an unresolved debt and return to his family by helping a wealthy investor (Ken Watanabe) invade a competitor’s dreams.

With a trained team by his side, Cobb attempts to plant ideas by drifting deeper and deeper into his target’s subconscious.

Through special effects that imitate the bizarre nature of dreams, “Inception” is a technical and narrative marvel.

The multilayered film encourages multiple viewings and its climax leaves room for many interpretations.

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