EMAIL IS DEAD: Check Out These 8 Innovative Alternatives Instead

email sucks

The web is a-buzzing with netizens lamenting the archaic and frustrating nature of email, the messaging platform we use every day.

Or you could call it the messaging platform that uses us every day.

Many people are finding that there isn’t enough time in the day to answer every email, and¬†it all adds up. Email is one of the newest culprits of workplace stress.

For starters, email was designed decades ago with users in mind who weren’t nearly as connected as we are now.

While these new solutions may not kick email to the curb any time soon, they’re bright signs of things to come–evidence of ways communication in the future will be more streamlined and efficient.

Or, is the ultimate problem that there are just more people trying to reach you?

Shortmail limits messages to 500 characters

Shortmail's modus operandi is keeping emails brief, succinct, and categorized by contact. No message can be greater than 500 characters in length.

It's kind of like Twitter, but for email, and without attachments.

Click here to learn how to use Shortmail.

Twitter's Direct Messages (DM) system is on all your devices

Sending DM's is a great way to reach someone, and you're guaranteed not to get spam because only people that you're following can DM you. DM's get organised in a thread view (like in Shortmail) by contact name.

At the same time, this also means you can't DM someone who you're trying to make contact with for the first time, which is a limitation.

So, for messaging people you're already close with, sending DMs is an effective way to get in touch because each DM is limited to 140 characters and most Twitter users have Twitter on their mobile devices as well.

Use Fridge to coordinate with groups

organising events and plans with groups via email can make your inbox explode.

Even with threaded messaging enabled (like in Gmail), it's tough to keep track of everything. This also, in turn, clutters your inbox so it's hard to see everything else.

Use a service like Y Combinator 2010-er Fridge to do all your group communication. It's secure, has a mobile app, and provides a separate area where non-critical emails can come in en masse and not harass you all day long.

Use instant messaging apps that log your conversations.

Using a free chat app like Adium (our favourite), you can stay logged in to Facebook chat, AIM, Google Talk/Chat, and more to keep in touch with people.

Instant messaging is old hat, you say? We use AIM at Business Insider so everyone's connected all the time and so we avoid long email chains. It helps us get things done, and group chats are very valuable as well.

Adium keeps track of chat logs so you can refer back to what somebody said (like in an email chain), and Google does the same thing if you use Google Chat inside of Gmail.

Instant messaging programs are no longer just for asking 'a/s/l?'

Facebook's new messaging platform brings email and Facebook messages together

Facebook's messaging platform gives you a new email address ( that feeds straight into your Facebook messages inbox.

It has smart filtering that moves messages that aren't from people (like messages from events) to an 'Other' inbox, and it's all threaded to stay neat and tidy. Also, whether messages are from Facebook friends or an external email address, it all maintains cohesiveness (UI-wise).

You can access your messages from the Facebook app, and you can even attach stuff. It all works surprisingly well, but we don't know anyone that uses it for common emails.

Texts are brief, and almost always get a response

If you really need to get in touch with somebody, texting is the best way.

Yes, typing a substantial message on a phone can be tiring, so sign up for Google Voice and get a new phone number you can use from your computer.

Send texts for free from your computer, and receive the responses on your computer inside the Google Voice inbox. No cramped thumbs involved (at least for you).

Pretend that email isn't email

The philosopher geniuses at want to change the way people email by changing the way people communicate ideas.

Forget intro paragraphs, forget outro sign-offs. Pledge to keep every email under three sentences, and hope your recipients will do the same (you paste the suggestion to do so into your mail signature).

So it's like Shortmail, but without having to get a new email address.

Gmail brought threaded messaging to the average user

Tons of people still aren't using Gmail. Some Gmail features make it a whole lot bigger than just email.

And it's not perfect, but it's a whole lot better than email used to be.

Gmail includes very useful features like labels, which makes it simple to have certain types of emails fly into respective folders, multiple inboxes, which lets you manage multiple email accounts within Gmail, intelligent filters for auto-sorting incoming emails, and Priority Inbox, which shows you the most important emails before everything else and learns based on who you reply to most.

Now that you've explored email alternatives...

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