An ex-RBS employee and customers have accused the bank of fraud, document manipulation, and forgery

LONDON — A former RBS employee and a number of customers have accused the bank of systematically manipulating documents and phone transcripts in order to cover up wrongdoing.

RBS has not responded to a request for comment from Business Insider, but denied the allegations to the BBC.

Mark Wright worked for the bank after it took over NatWest in 2000. He told the BBC that he reported two colleagues in RBS’ “Compliance Unit” in 2005 after they allegedly created false documents purporting to be from his own customers.

He told the BBC: “I had five individual customers who all came forward to me stating that the wording and conversations with this member of staff from group compliance were not their words, so effectively the telephone transcripts didn’t reflect what the customer was saying.”

The five customers submitted statements to the bank stating contradicting the falsified complaints, and two accused staff within the compliance unit subsequently left, but Wright says the bank failed properly to investigate the complaints and to afford him whistleblower status.

Documents and transcripts could allegedly have been manipulated for various reasons — to falsify customer records to suit the bank’s own purposes, or in some cases to cover the bank’s tracks after it sold loans to clients who were not eligible for them, it was claimed.

The BBC also reported that a number of former RBS employees and customers had come forward to claim that the bank acted fraudulently by falsifying documents and editing transcripts of phone calls.

Read the full BBC report here.

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