A bat flew out of an 86-year-old man's iPad case, bit him, and infected him with rabies

WMUR-TVRoy Syvertson didn’t expect to find a bat in his iPad case.
  • 86-year-old Roy Syvertson from New Hampshire got a shock when he opened up his iPad case to find a bat squeezed inside.
  • He told WMUR-TV he took the bat outside, but not before it nipped his finger.
  • He thought nothing of it until the next day when he saw the bat had died. The New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game then told him to seek medical attention immediately.
  • “It’s a good thing I didn’t decide to cuddle him a little bit,” Syvertson said, as the department later found out the bat had rabies.
  • Syvertson has recovered from his intruder’s attack, but he said it will remain a mystery as to how it snuck inside in the first place.
  • Visit INSIDER’s homepage for more stories.

When opening up your iPad, a rabid bat is probably the last thing you’d expect to see. But that’s what happened to 86-year-old Roy Syvertson from New Hampshire, when he noticed a surprise guest hiding in his tablet case.

“I opened it up like that and I flipped it around” Syvertson told WMUR-TV, showing how he usually gets his iPad out to watch something. “I looked, and the bat was coming out of here, between the cover and the back of the pad … And then I got up, still squeezing it, which I’m sure he wasn’t happy about, and I took him outside.”

Syvertson said the bat nipped his finger, which he thought felt like a bee sting at first. It was only the next day when the bad died that he realised: “I might have a problem.”

Syvertson called the New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game about his concerns.

“He said ‘I would like you to go to the hospital right away, waste no time,'” he said. “It’s a good thing I didn’t decide to cuddle him a little bit.”

Read more: A homeopathy enthusiast gave rabid dog saliva to a 4-year-old to treat bad behaviour – and scientists aren’t happy

Rabies is usually transmitted through the bite of an infected animal, and it is deadly if left untreated. Some symptoms include headache, weakness, nausea, and a fear of water brought on by trouble swallowing.

“A bat that flies into your room while you’re sleeping may bite you without waking you,” the Mayo Clinic website states. “If you awake to find a bat in your room, assume you’ve been bitten.”

At the hospital, Syvertson was given rabies treatment straight away, which was the right call as the Fish and Game department later confirmed the bat was rabid.

Syvertson has recovered from his intruder’s attack, but he said it will remain a mystery as to how it snuck inside in the first place.

“My joke of ‘he probably knew my password’ is not going to last forever,” he said. “That won’t be funny for a long time.”

Watch the full story from WMUR-TV below.

Business Insider Emails & Alerts

Site highlights each day to your inbox.

Follow Business Insider Australia on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram.