US Air Force F-22s and B-2 bombers are prowling the Pacific to send a message — and the photos are stunning

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, and F-22 Raptors from the Hawaii Air National Guard’s 154th Wing fly near Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii, during a interoperability training mission Jan. 15, 2019.
  • The B-2 Spirit, a heavy bomber, and the F-22 Raptor, an unmatched air-superiority fighter, are stealth aircraft capable of slipping past enemy defences to unleash a significant amount of firepower on enemy targets.
  • These two hard-hitting aircraft are training together in the Pacific, where China has sought to bolster its anti-access, area-denial capabilities to deter the US military.
  • The deployment to Hawaii is intended to reassure America’s international partners while sending a warning to adversaries that “the B-2 is on watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week ready to protect our country and its allies.”

The US Air Force has two of its most elite aircraft – the B-2 Spirit bomber and the F-22 Raptor – training together in the Pacific, reassuring America’s allies and sending a warning to strategic competitors and adversaries about the sheer power the US brings to the table.

These stunning photos show the powerful aircraft tearing across the Pacific, where the US has increasingly found itself facing challenges from a rising China.


Three B-2 bombers and 200 airmen from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri deployed to Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii on Jan. 10 to support US Strategic Command’s Bomber Task Force mission.

U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Kenneth Rodriguez SantiagoA U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, and two F-22 Raptors from the 199th Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii, fly in formation near Diamond Head State Monument, Hawaii, after completing interoperability training, Jan. 15, 2019.

Source: Pacific Air Forces


While B-2 bombers regularly rotate throughout the Pacific, having previously been deployed to Andersen Air Force Base on Guam, the most recent deployment marks only the second time these powerful stealth aircraft have been sent to Hawaii to drill alongside the F-22s.

U.S. Navy photo by MC2 Kenneth Rodriguez SantiagoA U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, and two F-22 Raptors from the 199th Fighter Squadron at Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii, fly in formation near Diamond Head State Monument, Hawaii, during an interoperability training mission Jan. 15, 2019.

Source: US sends stealth B-2s to the Pacific, warning regional rivals that America’s bombers are ‘on watch’ 24/7


The stealth bombers were deployed to the Pacific to send a message to allies and adversaries alike, specifically that “the B-2 is on watch 24 hours a day, seven days a week ready to protect our country and its allies.”

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, and F-22 Raptors from the Hawaii Air National Guard’s 154th Wing fly near Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii.

Source: Pacific Air Forces


When the B-2s were first deployed to Hawaii last October, the US military stressed that the deployment highlighted the bomber’s completely unmatched “strategic flexibility to project power from anywhere in the world.”

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfThe B-2 Spirit bomber is reportedly a crucial part of most war plans to fight China.

Source: Air Force


The multi-role B-2 Spirit bomber has the ability to break through tough defences, bringing a significant amount of firepower, both conventional and nuclear, to bear on enemy targets.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, conducts aerial refuelling near Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii.

Source: Air Force


Despite its large size, the B-2’s low-observable or stealth characteristics make it almost invisible to enemy radars, allowing it to slip past enemy defences and put valuable targets at risk.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA close-up of the B-2 Spirit bomber refuelling.

Source: Pacific Air Forces


The F-22 Raptor, an elite air-superiority fighter, which the Air Force asserts “cannot be matched by any known or projected fighter aircraft,” is an extremely lethal aircraft capable of performing air-to-air and air-to-ground combat missions.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfAn F-22 Raptor from the Hawaii Air National Guard’s 199th Fighter Squadron, conducts an aerial refuelling with a KC-135 Stratotanker.

Source: Air Force


Both the B-2 Spirit and the F-22 raptor are stealth aircraft, and both have the ability to penetrate sophisticated air-defence systems, such as those that defend the Chinese mainland and the wall of surface-to-air missiles deployed in the South China Sea. China has been actively enhancing its anti-access, area-denial capabilities to keep the US military at arms length.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA U.S. Air Force B-2 Spirit bomber flies near Joint Base Pearl Harbour-Hickam, Hawaii, during a interoperability training mission Jan. 15, 2019.

Together, a B-2 accompanied by a pair of F-22s could kick in an enemy’s door, let loose a firestorm of devastation, and get out before the enemy figures out what happened.

U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Russ ScalfA B-2 Spirit bomber deployed from Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, conducts aerial refuelling.

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