Australian WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange fears assassination by the CIA

Photo: Dan Kitwood/ Getty Images.

Australian WikiLeaks founder and hacker, Julian Assange, has expressed fears of being kidnapped or “droned” by the CIA if he were to step out of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London.

“There are security issues with being on the balcony. There have been bomb threats and assassination threats from various people,” he said in an interview with The Times.

“I’m a white guy,” Assange said. “Unless I convert to Islam it’s not that likely that I’ll be droned, but we have seen things creeping towards that.”

The Australian activist and hacker has been holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy in London since 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden where he was wanted for questioning over sexual assault charges.

Earlier this month Sweden dropped that investigation after it ran out of time to bring the charges against him. However, investigators still want to question him about a rape allegation which carries a 10-year statue of limitations.

Assange is also believed to be at risk of extradition from the UK and Sweden to the US for his involvement with WikiLeaks.

Earlier this year, Assange denied claims that he had filed an open letter to the French President Francois Hollande seeking political asylum in France.

According to European news site, The Local, Assange said that “only France finds itself in a position to offer me the necessary protection against… the political persecutions I face”.

“I am a journalist who has been pursued and threatened with death by the US authorities because of my professional activities.

“By welcoming me, it would be a humanitarian gesture by France.”

Swedish officials are expected to meet with their Ecuadorian counterparts tomorrow to find a way for Swedish prosecutors to question WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange over the rape allegation.

“It is the first time that we are going to meet and we will discuss a general agreement for judicial cooperation between the two countries,” Swedish justice ministry official Cecilia Riddselius told AFP on Friday.

Assange is hoping that his situation will be resolved in the next two years.

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