Australian video streaming platform EzyFlix has shut

Locally-owned video streaming business EzyFlix has ceased operations, the first victim of Netflix’s launch in Australia in March.

After launching in 2013, EzyFlix posted this message on its website this week.

Owned by Access Digital Entertainment, EzyFlix hasn’t provided a reason for its closure. But in June last year EzyFlix founder Craig White told Gizmodo’s Campbell Simpson because the platform wasn’t a subscription service users could buy only the content they wanted to watch, when they wanted to watch it.

“I already like to say that EzyFlix.tv is the 21st Century video store for tech-savvy millennials. While Pay TV and other subscription services appeal to sports lovers and more traditional households, millennials, by contrast, are as likely to value a set top box now or in the future, as they do a VHS video or cassette tape today,” he said at the time.

The company launched ahead of the video streaming war now playing out in Australia, with competition between Nine and Fairfax’s Stan, Foxtel and Seven’s Presto and the US giant Netflix is heating up.

Netflix is now in 8% of Australian homes, reaching 1.89 million people as of the end of July, Roy Morgan research from July shows.

Netflix has achieved solid marketshare in Australia, with Roy Morgan, Credit Suisse and Citi research all naming it the largest player by user base, but competitors have been feeling the pinch.

Fellow Australian streaming platform Quickflix admitted recently it was losing 5,000 users a month since Netflix launched. It’s share price has been hammered and is currently sitting at $0.001 a piece.

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