AUSTRALIAN STOCKS GO NOWHERE: Here's what you need to know

The 2017 Below The Belt Pedalthon at Sydney Motorsport Park, raising funds for below the belt cancers. Matt King/Getty Images for ANZUP

Australian stocks closed marginally lower.

Today’s scoreboard:

  • ASX 200: 5,713.60 -7.00 -0.12%
  • All Ordinaries: 5,772.40 -6.58 -0.11%
  • AUD/USD: 0.7984 +0.0025 +0.31%

The local market opened strongly, promising a second day of gains, but faded as the day headed to the close.

The miners were marginally higher and the major banks mixed.

The ANZ Bank was up 0.1% to $30.220 but the Commonwealth dropped 0.5% to $76.28.

Among the miners, Rio Tinto was up 0.3% to $66.89.

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