Australia Post Is Lobbying For Exclusive Government Use Of Its Digital Mailbox

Australia Post has asked the federal Labor and the Coalition to force federal agencies to use its Digital MailBox, potentially giving it a leg-up in its race against Digital Post Australia.

According to a report by Jason Murphy at the Australian Financial Review, Australia Post is trying to leverage its government-owned status to boost uptake of Digital MailBox.

Ace image / Shutterstock

Digital MailBox and Computershare-backed rival Digital Post will allow Australian residents to receive and store important mail: bills, bank statements, government letters and the like. Only authorised mailers may use the service, which lowers the risk of spam and scams.

Morgan Stanley analysts last year forecast digital mail to be a $138 million market. Only one service is expected to succeed in the long term.

Australia Post general manager of external communications Jane McMillan told the Fin that both sides of government had been supportive of electronic mailboxes.

She said it would be “wonderful” if an “incoming Coalition government would mandate the Australia Post digital mailbox”, noting that the Australian Taxation Office and Department of Human Services had already signed on for a pilot.

Digital Post declined to comment on the extent to which such a deal would affect its market share but an analyst played down the potential downside, suggesting that Australians typically only received a handful of letters from Federal Government agencies each year.

A Digital Post spokesperson said it had signed on 1000 clients via parent Computershare’s investor services business.

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