Australia is set to introduce new safety measures to protect people in crowded places

Pedestrians walk past newly-installed concrete security bollards outside the Lindt Cafe. Photo: William West/AFP/Getty Images

The Turnbull government is set to release a number of new safety measured designed to keep Australians safe in crowded public places.

Prime minister Malcolm Turnbull announced the measures, commissioned following the July 2016 attack in Nice, would be released “shortly”.

The announcement follows the deadly terrorist attacks in Barcelona overnight.

“The Australian public and the Australia people condemn the terrorist attack in Barcelona overnight,” Turnbull said on Friday morning.

“Our love, our prayers are with the victims of the families.

“At this stage, we understand 16 people have been killed, of course that death toll could rise and many injured.

“At this stage we understand three Australians have been injured, one seriously.”

Turnbull said consular officials are on their way to Barcelona from Madrid to support the Australian victims.

“We stand in absolute, resolute solidarity with the people of Spain in the fight against Islamist terrorism,” Turnbull said, adding that “this is a global battle against terrorism.

“Following the attack in Nice last year, the government has been working to improve the protection of Australians in public places.”

He said while protecting crowded places is “a very complex issue” the work has now been completed and will be released “shortly”.

The documents provided by the government are expected to include advice and tools for owners and operators of venues.

“What we seek to ensure is that when a new venue is being built… resilience is built into that.

“What we have been able to do here is bring a lot of experience from the Australian and New Zealand jurisdictions and indeed learn from international jurisdictions… so that we can pull that expertise to be seeking to improve and refine and advance measure to keep Australians safe.

“It is the product of very careful work with state and territory police, agencies, with local government, with the private sector,” and others.

“There is no place for set and forget on national security.”

In June, the City of Melbourne announced it was installing safety barriers around key landmarks in the CBD in response to the rising threat from terrorism and following January’s Bourke Street Mall attack, which left five people dead after a man drove his car through the busy pedestrian shopping precinct.

Sydney also instigated similar measures, installing concrete barricades in Martin Place the following month.

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