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Australia has never been more popular with international guests

Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images for Tourism NT

More international guests than ever before visited Australia in the past 12 months.

According to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics earlier today, approximately 7.9896 million short-term visitor arrivals were recorded in the 12 months to August in seasonally adjusted terms, the highest level on record.

The figure was 10.56% higher than the level seen in the year to August 2015, the fastest year-on-year percentage increase since August 2004.

In numeric terms, there were 763,400 more short-term arrivals over the past 12 months than there were in the year to August 2015.

Enormous.

Here’s a chart that shows the seven largest sources of short-term visitor arrivals to Australia over the past 12 months.

China, including arrivals from Hong Kong, strengthened its grip as the number once source of short-term arrivals, surging to 1.4199 million over the past year. It was up 21.3% on the levels of a year earlier.

Here are the remaining nations on the list, along with the percentage growth rate recorded over the past 12 months.

2. New Zealand 1.3229 million (+2.34%)

3. UK 705,200 (+4.43%)

4. USA 685,000 (+17.01%)

5. Singapore 433,000 (+13.2%)

6. Japan 391,000 (+20.23%)

7. Malaysia 368,700 (+10.69%)

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