'Military type ordinance' injures a man in Austin, Texas, rattling community already on edge over deadly package bombings

  • Police say a man was injured while handling a “military type ordinance” found in a box of donated goods in Austin, Texas, on Tuesday night.
  • It happened near a South Austin Goodwill store around Brodie Lane and West Slaughter Lane, local media reports said. The man was taken to a hospital and later released.
  • Initial reports indicated that there was an explosion, but the Austin Police Department said the item “was not a bomb.”
  • Police said they do not believe the incident is related to a series of package bombs that have killed two people and injured four others in and around the Texas capital this month.

Police in Austin, Texas, say a man was injured by what they described as an “military type ordinance” in an area of South Austin on Tuesday night.

It happened at a Goodwill store around Brodie Lane and West Slaughter Lane, the local news station KVUE reported. An employee was handling a box of donated goods that contained two military devices. One of the devices was activated, injuring the employee’s hand, police said.

Initial reports said that there was an explosion, but the Austin Police Department said on its Twitter account Tuesday night that the item “was not a bomb, but rather an incendiary device.”

“At this time, we have no reason to believe this incident is related to previous package bombs,” the police department said.

The incident is happening amid a series of package-bomb explosions that have rocked the Austin area this month. A package exploded at a FedEx facility in Schertz, Texas, earlier Tuesday, injuring a worker there.

Another package discovered at a FedEx facility near the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport the same day was determined to be an unexploded bomb, police said.

Explosions have rocked multiple parts of the Austin area beginning on March 2. Two people have been killed, and four others were injured.

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