AT&T Is Ending Its 'AdWorks' Mobile Experiment And Laying Off Staff

AT&T appears to be closing most if not all of its AdWorks offices and ending its experiment in mobile and digital ad sales, sources tell us. AT&T confirmed a change in strategy and some job cuts in a statement it gave to Business Insider.

Many if not most staff associated with AdWorks in New York were laid off this week, we hear. Sources previously indicated to us that there have been job cuts executed or planned at AdWorks in Los Angeles and Chicago, as reported on Business Insider last month.

Adworks was an ambitious project for AT&T. The company had hoped to put together a network of mobile publishers — apps and so on — that it could offer advertisers, coupled with the company’s own anonymized data.

In May, Adworks offered a program called Blueprint that purported to offer targeted ad buys across a range of media, mobile, TV and online. Blueprint may now be a thing of the past, we hear.

AT&T confirmed the move in general terms with this statement:

AdWorks is refocusing on advanced TV, mobile and online advertising with our owned and operated properties, including U-verse TV, uverse.com and att.net. We are moving away from our previous online and mobile ad networks, which represented only a small percentage of our business. As part of this realignment, we are reducing jobs that were dedicated to those previous ad networks we will no longer operate.

We understand that the company will stay in the ad sales business in terms of its U-verse TV offering. It’s not clear where this leaves vp/marketing and media innovation at AT&T AdWorks Maria Mandel Dunsche, who had previously made AdWorks Blueprint offering a priority.

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