Art Cashin's Latest Trivia Questions Are Driving People Completely Bananas

Art Cashin

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Art Cashin, UBS Financial Services’ director of floor operations at the NYSE, is a legend on the floor of the Big Board. He’s been there forever and he’s known across The Street for his popular, must-read daily newsletter Cashin’s Comments.

One of our favourite parts of his newsletter is the piece of trivia Cashin includes in each one.  

They’re usually a piece of logic or history and maths related.  They’re fun, but can get frustrating since you have to wait for the the next letter to see the answer. 

We’ve put together this month’s trivia.  (Google is for cheaters!)

Question from July 31st

Peter showed Bob a bag with 1 marble in it. That marble was either black or white. He then added one white marble. Bob (blindfolded) took one marble out which was white. What are the odds that the marble still in the bag is white??

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

While it seems like the odds should be 50/50, they are in fact 2 out of 3 that the remaining marble is white.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 1

Bob is 33 years old today. That is three times as old as Nick was when Bob was the age that Nick is today. How old is Nick?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Nick would be 22 years old.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 2

Move over Exxon Valdez - Possibly history's most famous commander of a vessel actually sought to run aground from the minute his journey began. Who was he??

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

History's most famous captain who was desperate to run aground was 'Noah.'

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 3

Today's Question - Aren't you 'the' guy who.....Find these famous guys who are most readily known by their name followed by the as in Alexander the Great.

1) B________ the K _________ 2) A________ the H_________

3) H________ the E__________ 4) J________ the R_________

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

1) Billy the Kid; 2) Attila the Hun; 3) Henry the Eighth; 4) Jack the Ripper

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 6

Three pounds of apples and two pounds of apricots cost $2.25. The apples cost less than the apricots. (One final clue - for the same $2.25 you could buy either apples only or apricots only and not wind up with fractional pounds.) How much per pound are the apples?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

The apples are 25 cents a pound and the apricots are 75 cents a pound.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 9

The other night 32 people showed up for the meeting of the Friends of Fermentation. All the specialists under 40 had brown hair. The specialists under 40 with brown hair were 5% of all the specialists with brown hair. Not everyone was a specialist. How many brown haired specialists were there? How many under 40.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Though specialists once traded in fractions, they don't come in fractions. So the answer to both questions could not be a fractional number. Since it was less than 32 (not all specialists), the only combination would be 20 brown-haired specialists and only 1 under 40 years old. I'll drink to that.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 10

'Just gimme the darn fish' - Newlywed Mrs. Kaye went to the fish store to purchase a dinner treat. The store owner turned out to be her old maths teacher who said his scale was broken but offered another way to figure the weight. He said, suppose the tail weighs nine ounces, the head as much as the tail and half the body, and the body weighs as much as the head and tail together. Now, what would be the weight of the fish?'

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Something's Fishy - Mrs. Kaye may have been newly-wed but she reached into her purse for her Betty Crocker Cooking Calculator (is she efficient or what?). Using it she determined the fish weighed 72 ounces or 4 1/2 pounds. The tail weighed 9 oz; the body 36 oz. and the head 27 oz. Next week - baccala.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 13

From a simpler time - In order to get Little Sal to study maths better, his dad offered to give him 8 cents for every problem he got right and take back 5 cents for every wrong answer. At the end of 26 problems, neither owed the other any money. How many problems did Sal get right?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Little Sal managed to get 10 problems correct.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 16

More clued anagrams:

Finked = _________ (et tu Brute?)

Mingler = _________ (plane pain)

Travel = _________ (a rogue to Robin)

Braille = _________ (Newt's blind man)

Limped = _________ (Shirley's Asset)

Answer

Finked = Knifed (et tu Brute?)

Mingler = Gremlin (plane pain)

Travel = Varlet (a rogue to Robin)

Braille = Liberal (Newt's blind man)

Limped = Dimple (Shirley's Asset)

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 17

A boy and a girl are talking. 'I'm a boy' says the one with dark hair. 'I'm a girl' says the one with blonde hair. If at least one of them is lying which is which and what colour is the girl's hair?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

The trick here was two part. If one was lying and the choice was gender (only two possibilities) the other had to be lying too. If 'A' said he was a boy but was in fact a girl then 'B' would have had to say he was a boy to be truthful. So....the girl had dark hair.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 20

Professor Keker knew how to get the Freshman Class's attention. He put three cans of beer on one side of a balance board. He put a half pound lead weight and one can of beer on the other. The board balanced evenly. OK, Hot Shots! he said, 'What does each of these cans of beer weigh? OK hotshots, what's the answer?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Each can of beer weighed 4 ounces or 1/4 lb. (That is, assuming all the cans were equal). So many people got it so quickly, that maybe some dependency counseling is in order.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 21

You have nine seemingly identical rare coins. But you are told one coin is short weight. How can you find the light coin in two weighings? (You only have a balance scale.)

Source: Cashin's Comments

Answer

Finding the short weight coin - divide the 9 coins into 3 sets of 3 coins (A, B, C). Weigh A versus B. If they balance, the short coin is in 'C' (if they don't balance, the problem coin is in the lighter set). Having identified the problem set, weigh two of those coins. If they balance, it's the third coin.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Question from August 22

What am I - Karnak? The commuter train card game blew up when the deck turned out to have only 30 cards. Shifting to parapsychology, the boys played 'guess the colour of the next card' awarding 10 points for each 'correct' and no penalty for wrong. They went through the deck, shuffled and went through it 2 more times. Amazingly, there were 45 correct guesses (marked deck I suspect). Anyway, Wally's score was 55% of Sal's total. Wally and Larry together scored 25% more than Sal. How many 'right' guesses did each one get?

Source Cashin's Comments

Answer

Sal guessed 20 cards right. Wally got 14 and Larry got 11. Maybe you guessed already, Larry usually loses the regular game.

Source: Cashin's Comments

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