4 Art Cashin Trivia Questions That Will Make You Feel Like An Idiot

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Photo: CNBC

Art Cashin, UBS Financial Services’ director of floor operations, is known for his daily letter Cashin’s Comments.He’s also known for putting a piece of trivia (usually logic, maths or history) at the end of every letter.  

The brain teasers are a lot of fun and we always look forward to learning the answer the following day. (Of course, Google is for cheaters.)

Since the stock market was closed on Friday, there are only 4 trivia questions from this week’s Cashin’s Comments.  We put the answer on each subsequent slide.  

We kick things off with the answer to last Friday’s question.  Good luck!  

Last Friday's Question

'Your planet or mine?' Astronaut Ron found himself safely on the planet Zilat. There were two species on the planet - one set had one eye....the other 2 eyes. One set told only the truth. The other only lied. Ron asked a single eyed alien if he was a truth teller. The alien replied - 'Zyxtrap!' Confused, Ron asked a 2 eyed alien what the first had said. The 2 eyed alien, using hand signals, indicated that 'Zyxtrap' meant yes but warned that the first alien was a liar. Who told the truth?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Last Friday's Answer

The answer to Ron's first question naturally had to be 'yes' whether from a liar or a truth teller. Since the second alien said the word meant yes, he (or she) had to be a truth teller.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Monday's Question

And, they never played football either. There are nine U.S. President who never attended college. Can you name all nine?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Monday's Answer

The nine U.S. Presidents who never attended college were: Washington; Jackson, Van Buren; Taylor; Fillmore; Lincoln; Johnson; Cleveland; and Truman.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Tuesday's Question

A seasonal repeat - Who or what determines when Easter falls each year? (Hint: It is based on Passover so you get bonus points for answering both.)

Source: Cashin's Comments

Tuesday's Answer

The formula for when Easter falls, as you probably know, is that it shall be the first Sunday on, or after, the first full moon following the Vernal Equinox, the first day of Spring. It was set by the Council of Nicaea in 325 A.D. which as you remember was called by the Emperor Constantine. Because of the formula's basis in Astronomy, Easter can never be later than April 25 nor earlier than March 22. Passover, on the other hand is on the 15th day of the month of Nisan. Now as you may have guessed, the Council of Nicaea suspected that not everyone's calendar, even with the picture of the two kittens climbing out of a basket, would have the month of Nisan on it. So to avoid bothering their Jewish neighbours by asking each Spring when is the 15th of Nisan, they approximated the date with the above mentioned astronomical formula. Since the month of Nisan always starts on a new moon (as does every month in the Jewish calendar), the 15th of the month would be at - or proximate to - a full moon. That's why the two holidays are tied so closely together each year. This year they are only one day off from their original link. Passover was on Thursday before the first Easter. This year Passover begins at sundown on Friday evening. (Special thanks to Mr. Joseph Berman for his input on the Biblical Lunar Calendar.)

Source: Cashin's Comments

Wednesday's Question

Where is the only place today that the U.S. Flag is flown at full staff, 24 hours a day, every day of year without being raised, lowered, artificially illuminated or saluted?

Source: Cashin's Comments

Wednesday's Answer

That flag flies on the 'Moon' (the hints about illuminating and saluting made it much too easy).

Source: Cashin's Comments

Thursday's Question

Anagram this Batman. Take the full name of a recent female singing star and switch the letters around to give you a single word which can be either the members of a religious group or a couple of cocktails bearing the same name.

Source: Cashin's Comments

Want to know the answer?

You'll have to come back next week. In case you missed it, check out 5 More Art Cashin Brain Teasers That Will Make You Feel Dumb >

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