Apple could release a cheap Apple TV dongle to get more people hooked

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  • Apple has considered the release of a lower-priced Apple TV dongle similar to the Google Chromecast and Amazon Fire Stick, according to a report by The Information on Wednesday.
  • For Apple, a low-price dongle could make sense, given the upcoming launch of the company’s streaming video service.
  • A device that’s cheaper than the Apple TV could help broaden Apple’s audience for its original and licensed content.

Apple has considered the release a lower-priced Apple TV dongle similar to the Roku Streaming Stick or Amazon Fire TV Stick, according to a report by The Information on Wednesday.

It’s not clear if Apple ultimately decided whether or not to move forward with plans to release such a device. For Apple, though, a lower-price TV dongle could make sense, given that the company’s upcoming streaming service is set to launch as early as March 2019.

The streaming service will only be available on the iPad, iPhone, and Apple TV. Given that the Apple TV costs at least $US149, a cheaper device for accessing the company’s content could help broaden Apple’s audience.

Today, Amazon and Roku dongles – which plug into the back of televisions and allow users to stream content- cost as little as $US25 and $US30 respectively.

Apple’s streaming service will include a combination of original content and licensing deals with production companies. The company has already announced 19 original series, including a biographical drama about Kevin Durant and an untitled series starring Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston.


Read more:

The 19 original shows Apple is producing in its push into TV as an ‘expensive NBC’

Apple has already spent more than $US1 billion producing its original content. In October, CNBC reported that Apple’s original TV and movie content might be free for anyone accessing it through an iPhone or iPad.

Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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