Everything we know about Apple's plans to change how we watch TV

There’s little question at this point that Apple is working on building a streaming TV service.

The company is known for taking products with frustrating and unfriendly user experiences — for many Americans, cable and satellite TV service would definitely fall into this category — and creating beautifully designed products and services that appeal to millions of people.

If Apple were to come out with a streaming TV service, it could have broad implications across the TV industry. As soon it’s released, millions of people will be able to choose another company to pay for their TV. The competition may force pay TV companies like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and DirecTV, which traditionally haven’t had much competition, to offer smaller, more flexible packages, improve customer services, and perhaps even lower fees and prices.

Apple hasn’t said anything publicly about a TV service, but there are plenty of rumours and leaks about what it could look like.

Check out everything we think we know about Apple’s rumoured TV service.

It will likely include CBS.

Les Moonves, the CEO of CBS, told Re/Code's Kara Swisher in May that he recently had met with Apple vice president Eddy Cue to talk about the new TV service. Moonves said CBS will 'probably' be a part of it.

It will be a great fit for the iPad.

Apple

Apple said at its annual conference for developers in June that a software update to the iPad will include a new picture-in-picture feature, which will allow people to check email or respond to a text message while watching a video. It's easy to see how well this feature would work with a streaming TV service.

It may include local channels.

Re/Code's Peter Kafka and Dawn Chmielewski reported in May that Apple has been negotiating with local broadcast channels to include them on the service. Similar services, like Sling TV, don't offer local channels.

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