Apple has a bunch of secret buildings named after Greek deities

Apple has quietly bought and leased a bunch of buildings and named them after Greek deities, according to a report today in the Silicon Valley Business Journal based on documents filed with city governments.

A lot of the buildings seemingly relate to Apple’s reported plans to build an electric, possibly self-driving, car.

We had already heard about a building in Sunnyvale where neighbours were complaining about “motor noises” emerging late at night.

That building is reportedly code-named “Rhea,” which could be a reference to its reported car project code-named “Titan” (Rhea was one of the titans in Greek mythology.) Building plans include obvious automotive references like a “lube bay” and “wheel balancer,” the Business Journal reports.

Other buildings in the report include:

  • Medusa, a former manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale. Rooms in the building plans are marked for purposes like “eye tracking” and “vision lab.”
  • Magnolia, a former FedEx facility that’s marked to include a giant machine called a “regenerative thermal oxidizer” that can reduce pollution and is used in manufacturing.
  • Zeus, a massive former research facility in San Jose that is slated for an “interim lab” with a handful of researchers. It’s going to be surrounded by a fence that onlookers can’t see through.
  • Athena, which used to be a Maxim chip-making facility. It’s not clear what Apple is going to do with it.
  • Corvinus, a building in Santa Clara slated for unknown “industrial use.”

These facilities are in addition to the new spaceship-like circular office building Apple is building in Cupertino, which will be done early next year.

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