Photos Of Apple's Next MacBook Air Might Have Just Leaked

Apple is expected to release a new MacBook Air with a 12-inch screen sometime this year, and a new set of photos may show us exactly how it compares in size to some of Apple’s other products.

Chinese blog iFanr (via 9to5Mac) posted several images that reportedly show the new MacBook Air’s lid alongside the current 13-inch MacBook Air and iPad Air 2. What’s strange about the images, as 9to5Mac pointed out, is that the Apple logo appears to be different than that of Apple’s existing MacBook Airs. It’s the same glossy logo you’ll find on the back of the iPad Air rather than the white one present on Apple’s MacBooks.

Still, previous reports have said Apple may change the logo on its future laptops to match that of the iPad, so there’s a chance the images may be accurate.

Here’s the 12-inch laptop lid on top of the 13-inch MacBook Air’s lid.

And here it is again on the 13-inch MacBook’s keyboard.

A better look at what may be the new Apple logo for the MacBook.

Here’s how much larger the 12-inch MacBook will be than the iPad Air 2, which as a 9.7-inch screen.

The lid looks like it will be slightly thicker than that of the iPad Air 2.

If Apple does unveil a new 12-inch MacBook Air this year, there’s a strong chance it will have a Retina display just like Apple’s line of MacBook Pros, iPads, and iPhones. The laptop will likely be about the same size as the 11-inch MacBook Air, but the screen will have thinner bezels to accommodate the larger display, according to 9to5Mac’s Mark Gurman. It’s also expected to be a lot thinner than the current models, and Gurman reports that Apple will cut out the MacBook Air’s ports to achieve this.

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