'The most important Apple executive you've never heard of' is now also Apple's 2nd-best paid

AppleApple’s Johny Srouji is now the company’s second-best-paid executive.
  • Apple’s senior vice president of hardware technologies, Johny Srouji, is now the company’s second-best-paid exec behind only Apple’s retail chief, Angela Ahrendts.
  • Srouji made $US24,162,392 in total compensation at Apple in 2017.
  • Srouji oversees Apple’s fast-growing processor-making operations, spearheading the design of custom iPhone processors.
  • This was Srouji’s debut on the list of top-paid Apple executives.

In 2016, Bloomberg called Johny Srouji “the most important Apple executive you’ve never heard of.” It’s a well-earned title: Apple is making more custom processors in-house, and Srouji is the brains behind that operation.

Now, a new shareholder proxy statement from Apple reveals that Srouji is officially the company’s second-best-paid executive, behind only Apple’s retail chief, Angela Ahrendts.

According to that statement, Srouji made $US24,162,392 in total compensation in 2017; Ahrendts made a hair more at $US24,216,072. CEO Tim Cook actually draws the lowest compensation of Apple’s executive team, at $US12,825,066.

Srouji joined Apple in 2008, and he was promoted to senior vice president of hardware technologies in 2015.

We know this is a raise for Srouji, as it’s his first time being listed as a named executive in a shareholder proxy filing. According to the Securities and Exchange Commission, publicly traded companies like Apple have to publicly disclose the compensation for their CEO, CFO, and then at least the next three highest-paid company executives. Srouji didn’t make that cut last year but did this year, indicating he got a raise.

We also know Apple really wants to keep Srouji around. When he first took the senior VP role at Apple in 2015, the company gave him almost $US10 million in a stock bonus, to vest over four years.

It’s no wonder why, though. Srouji oversaw the release of the A4 processor for the iPhone, the first Apple had created in-house. More recently, he spearheaded the A11 Bionic chip that powers the iPhone 8 and X models. And reports have swirled that Apple may make its own processors for Mac laptops, too.

That puts Srouji right in the center of two of Apple’s core businesses. And the company seems set on keeping him around.

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