Apple Thinks The IWatch Will Look So Good, It's Inviting Fashion Editors To Its Tuesday Launch Event

Jony iveGetty Images/Gareth CattermoleApple lead designer Jony Ive at a fashion show.

It sounds like Jony Ive isn’t the only one convinced Apple’s wearable will feature an impressive design.

According to Reuters, Apple has invited prominent fashion editors and bloggers to its Tuesday launch event.

The move adds further credibility to reports that Apple will unveil its highly anticipated iWatch wearable alongside the iPhone 6.

“I assume it’s because they are unveiling a wearable,” said Lea Goldman to Reuters. Goldman is the features and special projects director for Marie Claire magazine, and this is her first invitation to an Apple event. “This suggests Apple is serious about tapping into the fashion world, which often sits on the sidelines.”

In past interviews, Apple CEO Tim Cook has spoken to the high standard required for a wearable device to be succesful, and Apple extending an invitation to the fashion world proves the company thinks the iWatch will stand up to critique from fashion and tech critics alike.

Just last week, Apple lead designer Jony Ive was overheard bragging about the iWatch’s design and attention to detail, saying that Switzerland was in trouble, though he reportedly used a stronger word than “in trouble.”

Apple has recently added a number of prominent fashion icons to its team, with the most recent being influential designer Marc Newson, a close personal friend and collaborator with Jony Ive.

Little is known about what the iWatch will look like, but the wearable is expected to include a variety of health sensors that will integrate with Apple’s HealthKit ecosystem. It will likely include a flexible display, wireless charging, and a processor “about the size of a postage stamp.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.