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Apple just announced the 2011 Mac Mini is obsolete

Apple
  • Apple declared the 2011 Mac Mini “obsolete” on Monday.
  • “Obsolete” Apple products are not eligible for repairs or service at Apple stores.
  • Apple has not updated the Mac Mini since 2014, but executives say it remains a product in Apple’s lineup.

Apple declared the 2011 Mac Mini “obsolete” on Monday, which means Apple and authorised repair centres will no longer be able to repair the tiny Mac desktop.

MacRumors was first to report the 2011 Mac Mini is no longer eligible for service. If you’ve got a 2014 Mac Mini, Apple will still repair it.

It’s not a surprise move – Apple usually declares products “obsolete” five years after it stops manufacturing them, although there are a few regions and areas where Apple is legally required to provide service for older machines.

The one remaining Mac Mini model that’s eligible for service – the 2014 edition, which was updated over three years ago – is also getting long in the tooth. It uses an Intel processor that is five generations old, and it lacks the USB-C ports Apple is currently putting on its Mac computers.

Apple has said it plans to release a new, high-end iMac Pro this month that starts at $US4,999. It’s also reportedly planning a modular Mac Pro in the coming year, which will require a separate display.

But many companies and people like the Mac Mini, which is Apple’s lowest-cost Mac computer, and allows users to choose their own monitor and keyboard.

Apple has not announced plans to update the Mac Mini. In April, Apple’s head of marketing said the Mac Mini “remains an important product in our lineup.

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