The 12 Most Annoying Things That Tech Companies Need To Fix Right Now

crying babyYou could call us cry babies. You would not be far from the truth.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Without question, it’s awesome to be alive right now thanks to all the amazing technology we have in our lives.Instant access to every piece of information, every song, every movie, and just about anything else we want is right in our pocket thanks to our iPhone. It’s pretty hard to get lost thanks to the iPhone, too. We get instant, simple contact with friends from Facebook, Twitter, and email.

And yet, for all of the incredible things the big brains (mostly) in Silicon Valley have thought up, there are one or two small things they forget. Maybe it’s because they just don’t realise the problems of us normal folks, or perhaps because they don’t think it’s important, or perhaps they just can’t solve certain problems.

Whatever the reason, these forgotten features are the things that annoy the heck out of us in the world of tech.

Why can't we store movies from Netflix locally on our phone like we can in music applications?

One of the great things about music applications like Spotify or Mog is that we can store songs locally on our phones so that when we lose our wireless connection we can still listen to our favourite tunes.

We'd love to have the same option with Netflix, YouTube, HBO GO, or any of the video applications. That way when we hop on a flight or a long subway ride we could watch some TV shows.

Google's decision to merge professional and personal email accounts is maddening

In the last month, or so, Google decided--for reasons we don't understand--to make its professional and personal email accounts work through the same log in page. Previously we were able to log in to our Business Insider email accounts on a browser in one window, and log in to our personal email accounts in the other window. We can no longer do this. It's either BI Gmail, or Personal Gmail on the same browser. This is some frustrating B.S.

The seconds and sometimes minutes it takes the iPhone's email app to fully download a message

Our daily commute takes us above ground via the Manhattan Bridge on the D or N train for a few minutes. In those precious minutes of open air, we rip out our phone, load email and Twitter to see what we've missed--it's been 15 minutes since we last had a 3G connection, surely something must have happened!!?!?!

But, to our consternation, when we look at our email we often see the sender's name, the subject line, one sentence of content, and nothing else ... We click into the message but we see a message that says something like, 'this message has no content,' or 'loading.'

This allegedly has something to do with the fact that we're getting our messages run through a Gmail account. Or it might have something to do with AT&T's 3G connection. Whatever the case may be, we hate it.

Hey Twitter, figure out how to figure out when I've looked at DMs

If we check a DM, or an @ reply on Twitter for iPhone, Twitter should be smart enough to know it on the desktop and on the iPad. If we haven't used the iPad for a few days we see the little notification of new DMs and @ replies, even though we've seen all of those things already. It's a small problem, but it should be fixed by one of the engineers at the company.

Google and the MTA need to collaborate on subway closures and changes

One of the greatest things in the world of technology for someone that lives in New York is Google Maps' integration of the subway schedule. It makes planning trips a breeze.

The only problem? On the weekends, it's basically useless because New York radically changes its subway plans, shutting down lines, making express trains local, and re-routing trains -- like running D trains over N lines and F trains over A lines or whatever other goofy thing they can think of.

The MTA's 'trip planner' site works well for sorting out all the messes of the subway, but it's not as easily accessed through our phones. There has to be some way for Google to get the information the MTA has and use it with Google Maps, right?

iCloud better fix Apple's horrendous device syncing

Apple's iCloud is supposed to address this, so we're going to complain about it one last time, hopefully ...

Syncing across iDevices is a horrible joke. If we rent a movie on our iPad, then want to transfer that rental to an iPhone, we're out of luck. If we want to download a podcast on our computer at work, then transfer it to our iPhone we have to wipe out the phone's music library.

Hopefully Apple fixes this garbage.

Facebook needs to calm down with the IM, asking for our cell, and trying to get us to set Facebook as our home page

Dear Facebook, we use Facebook how we want, not how you want. So please stop trying to get us to use IM, stop trying to steal our cell phone numbers, and stop telling us to make your page our home page. If we want those things, we'll let you know.

Google, please allow us to mark all messages that are unread as unread in our inbox

If we haven't read an email after 3 months, it's safe to say it's not important. Let us mark all unread messages in our inbox as unread so that we don't have 1,000+ unread messages every time we sign in. We don't mean all the 'unread' messages on the first page, either. We mean ALL unread messages, please.

LinkedIn needs to calm down with its emails

Is there anyone that uses LinkedIn that doesn't feel overwhelmed with pointless emails from LinkedIn?

Autocorrect is a blessing and a curse

Dear autocorrect, when we type in 'me,' we mean, 'me,' not 'Mr.' Why on earth would we want Mr.? It makes no sense. Let's get it together, autocorrect.

Apple's email app struggles to remember email addresses

Our own Henry Blodget put it best earlier this year:

The phone forgets email addresses that it used to recognise and auto-complete. This infuriates me. I'll exchange a bunch of emails with, say, Joe Weisenthal, and for a while, the phone knows who Joe Weisenthal is. Every time I type 'jwe...' into the address field, up pops Joe Weisenthal's full address. And that's cool. Because it sucks to have to type [email protected] on your iPhone when you're trying to send a quick email (go ahead--just try typing that without making errors. And don't even get me started on what the 'auto-correct' does to jweisenthal). But if some days or weeks pass before I have to send another unsolicited email to Joe Weisenthal (ie, one in which I'm not answering a prior email), the phone will have forgotten Joe Weisenthal's email address! So I have to retype the whole thing! Infuriating. (Go ahead and blast me for being so stupid and lazy as to not just add Joe Weisenthal to my address book. But screw that--the iPhone should just do it for me. Anytime I send an email to someone, the phone should remember his or her email address forever. And don't lie and be fanboyish and say that you don't wish yours did that.)

Captchas suck. (Do we need to say anything else on this one?)

Obviously, these are tiny complaints. To remind ourselves how awesome life is, we'll watch this classic Louie C.K. bit

Phew! That felt good. Anything else bothering you, let us know in the comments ...

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