Andrew Ross Sorkin Admits He Has No Willpower Around Glazed doughnuts

Andrew Ross Sorkin

Photo: AP

Andrew Ross Sorkin, columnist for The New York Times, founder and editor-at-large of DealBook, co-anchor of CNBC’s Squawk Box, and author of “Too Big to Fail,” is a self-described “human garbage disposal.” [via DealBreaker]”If food is in front of me, I have to eat it,” Sorkin told Grub Street as part of its “The New York Diet” series.

Seriously.  The guy can eat.

Here’s what we learned about his dietary habits. [via Grub Street]

Sorkin says he remains disciplined with his diet until someone puts Dunkin’ doughnuts in his face.  Apparently it’s a weakness.

“…All is well in the world, until someone brings Dunkin’ doughnuts to the Times office. No willpower around glazed doughnuts. I could eat a whole table of them. They’re classic and timeless, without being too sugary and complicated.”

The financial journalist also likes — no scratch that. He really, really LOVES to snack on Stacey Chips.

“…It starts with a glass of red wine and half a bag of Stacey Chips. Then I eat more, but with hummus. They’re the greatest chips in the history of all chips. When I was writing my book three years ago, I’d go to a bodega at eleven o’clock at night for a liter of Diet Coke, a couple beers, and my Stacey Chips.”

And when he’s not too busy stuffing his face, he’ll head to the gym. He likes to have a protein drink post-workout, although it doesn’t sound like he’s seeing the desired results quite yet.

 “I worked out midday and had some Muscle Milk after, like a chocolate protein drink. They don’t work, but I figure I’ll keep trying.”

But perhaps the most telling thing about Sorkin’s dietary habits is he’s not afraid to eat the food off of a pair of venture capitalists’ plates. 

I went to lunch with two venture capitalists at Michael’s. Their choice, not mine. I like it there because that’s how people know you haven’t died yet. Ate salmon with mustard and sorbet for dessert. OK, the venture capitalists offered me some bread pudding, and I got all in on that, too.

Read the full Grub Street profile here >>

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