An ASX-listed healthcare company's CEO has been ordered to appear in court over dealings during his time at Leighton

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Peter Gregg, the CEO of ASX-listed pathology provider Primary Health Care, has been summonsed to appear in court on allegations relating to his time as chief financial officer at construction group Leighton Holdings.

He has been served with a Local Court attendance notice by corporate watchdog ASIC (Australian Securities and Investments Commission), according to a statement by Primary Health Care.  

A short time ago, shares in the company were down 4% to $4.03.

ASIC alleges two contraventions of Section 1307(1) of the Corporations Act during his time as an officer of Leighton Holdings Limited.

That section of the law deals with the “concealment, destruction, mutilation or falsification” of books belonging to a company.

ASIC has been investigating Leighton, now called CIMIC, over dealings relating to construction work in Iraq.

In a statement today, ASIC said Gregg had been charged with two counts of falsifying company documents in 2011.

Gregg is due to appear in the Downing Centre Local Court in Sydney on January 31. The case is being prosecuted by the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

Primary Health Care, a pathology and medical services company, said in a written statement: “Mr Gregg has informed Primary that he denies the allegations.”

The statement from the company didn’t name the court date. ASIC has been contacted for comment.

The board of directors at Primary Health Care is meeting today to review the implications. Gregg was appointed managing director and CEO in 2015.

Primary Health Care in August posted full year revenue of $1.7 billion and a net profit of $74.7 million.

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