Americans who give birth at any point in 2021 will be eligible for an additional $1,400 stimulus check from the new COVID-19 relief plan

Mother and baby
Parents will be eligible to receive an additional $US1,400 ($1,817) check for any baby that is born in 2021 in the new COVID-19 relief package. Sara Monika/Getty Images
  • Congress passed a new $US1.9 ($2) trillion COVID-19 relief bill on Wednesday.
  • Americans who give birth at any point in 2021 are eligible to receive additional stimulus money.
  • President Joe Biden is expected to sign the legislation on Friday.

Americans who give birth in 2021 will be eligible for an additional $US1,400 ($1,817) stimulus check as a part of the new COVID-19 relief package passed by Congress, according to a Democratic aide familiar with the relief legislation.

President Joe Biden is expected to sign the “American Rescue Plan” COVID-19 bill on Friday after the House passed it on Wednesday.

As part of the relief bill, any American earning up to $US75,000 ($97,313) annually is eligible to receive a $US1,400 ($1,817) stimulus check and couples making up to $US150,000 ($194,627) will receive the full $US1,400 ($1,817) per person, including children.

The payments are capped at $US160,000 ($207,602) for couples, meaning joint-filers earning more than that don’t qualify for a check.

As with the previous stimulus packages, the new relief bill includes a provision that allows any person who gives birth in 2021 to receive an additional $US1,400 ($1,817) check for the baby. Once the baby is born, the parents can receive the additional $US1,400 ($1,817) after filing their tax return in 2022, the Democratic aide said. They are also eligible for a smaller amount if they earn just below $US160,000 ($207,602).

Parents will also qualify for an expanded child tax credit as a result of the legislation. For children aged 5 and below, parents can get $US3,600 ($4,671) for each one. They can also receive $US3,000 ($3,893) for kids aged 6 to 17. Democrats are aiming to provide families to receive the amount in a lump sum at tax time or monthly checks distributed through the IRS.

Though GOP legislators decried the bill for a lack of bipartisanship in its drafting, recent polling shows the legislation is popular with Americans across the political spectrum.