53% American adults say they don't want to fly on a Boeing 737 Max

Joe Raedle/Getty ImagesGrounded American Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 jets.
  • The Boeing 737 Max represents the latest generation of narrow-body passenger jets. It’s also the latest version of the Boeing 737, the best-selling airliner in aviation history.
  • The 371 Boeing 737 Max planes already delivered to airlines have been grounded by the Federal Aviation Administration and regulatory agencies around the world following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 last week.
  • We asked more than 1,100 respondents “If you had a flight on a Boeing 737 Max next week, and the FAA decided to clear the aircraft for flight, given the issues the plane has experienced, what would you do?”
  • In total, 53% of respondents said they would attempt to reschedule while 32% said they wouldn’t change their travel plans.

The Boeing 737 Max represents the latest generation of narrow-body passenger jets. It’s also the latest version of the Boeing 737, the best-selling airliner in aviation history.

However, following the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 last week, the 371 Boeing 737 Max planes already delivered to airlines have been grounded by the Federal Aviation Administration and regulatory agencies around the world. It was the second fatal crash involving a nearly brand-new 737 Max 8 since October.

The jets remain grounded as Boeing works on a software update for the 737 Max control system that will hopefully fix the issues experienced by pilots.

Over the weekend, Business Insider polled American adults on their feelings about the 737 Max. We asked more than 1,100 respondents “If you had a flight on a Boeing 737 Max next week, and the FAA decided to clear the aircraft for flight, given the issues the plane has experienced, what would you do?”

Read more: The Boeing 737 Max is now one of the most controversial airliners of all time. Here are 3 others.

In total, 53.1% of respondents said they would reschedule. Of those, the survey found that 18.7% of respondents would reschedule their flight only if it didn’t require a fee. Another 4.4% of respondents said they would pay to reschedule their flight up to a certain monetary fee, which they then typed in. A full 30% of people would cancel or reschedule their flights, regardless of the cost to them.

Among those willing to pay to change their flight up to a certain point, on average they would be amenable to spending $US128 in fees, according to the 10% trimmed mean.

However, there are still a large number of American adults who would be perfectly fine flying on the 737 Max once the FAA deems the fleet fit for service.

Of those who responded, 9.4% said they “wouldn’t have any issue” flying on the plane while 22.9% said they are concerned, but not enough to change their travel plans. A further 14.6% simply said they don’t know.

SurveyMonkey Audience polls from a national sample balanced by census data of age and gender. Respondents are incentivized to complete surveys through charitable contributions. Generally speaking, digital polling tends to skew toward people with access to the internet. SurveyMonkey Audience doesn’t try to weight its sample based on race or income. Total 1,178 respondents collected March 16-17, 2019, a margin of error plus or minus 3.07 percentage points with a 95% confidence level.

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