US Navy fighter jet from aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt crashed into the Pacific during training flight

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Zachary WheelerAn F/A-18E Super Hornet flies over the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, June 17, 2020
  • A US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet from the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt’s air wing crashed into the sea Thursday, the Navy said in a statement.
  • Both aviators were able to eject safely and are in good condition, but the incident follows a series of aviation mishaps in recent weeks, one of which was fatal.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet crashed into the sea Thursday, the US Navy’s 7th Fleet said in a statement.

The fighter jet, part of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt’s air wing, crashed during routine pilot proficiency training. Both naval aviators were able to safely eject from the aircraft and were recovered by a helicopter crew from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 8. Both individuals are in good condition.

The Theodore Roosevelt returned to sea toward the end of May after being sidelined in Guam for two months by a serious coronavirus outbreak that saw around 1,200 sailors fall ill and one die.

Thursday’s F/A-18 crash in the Philippine Sea is the second US military plane to crash this week, following an incident Monday in which a US Air Force F-15C crashed into the sea off the coast of the UK. The pilot, 1st Lt. Kenneth “Kage” Allen, died in the crash.

This week’s unfortunate aviation incidents follow two back-to-back crashes at Eglin Air Force Base in May involving a F-22 Raptor and a F-35A Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter. In both cases the pilots were able to eject safely.

Last week, a F-35A had a rough landing when its landing gear collapsed after it returned to Hill Air Force Base following a routine training flight.

Thursday’s crash, like the other incidents, is currently under investigation.

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