A UBank co-founder has joined Australian fintech startup Tyro

Natalie Dinsdale of Tyro. (Source: supplied)

Tyro, the first-ever fintech startup to get an Australian banking licence, has continued on its high-powered recruitment spree, nabbing financial industry veteran Natalie Dinsdale to its leadership team.

Dinsdale, who was one of the founders of NAB’s online-only brand UBank, has been appointed Tyro’s head of brand & marketing.

“Tyro is one of Australia‚Äôs most remarkable growth stories, and the opportunity to be part of an organisation dedicated solely to giving SMEs a better deal is incredibly exciting,” she said.

While Dinsdale has been involved in the high-profile launch of Virgin Money’s mortgages business and was a part of Bankwest’s push into the east coast, her latest gig was leading her own e-commerce startup in the parenting sector for four years.

Her business, named Mamadoo, no longer seems to be running with both the blog and website now inaccessible. Dinsdale has also held executive positions with Telstra, Foxtel and Citibank.

Tyro has reformed its executive team since it was awarded the banking licence from APRA in August. Founder Jost Stollman, a former German politician, stepped down as chief executive in October to make way for Gerd Schenkel.

Schenkel was also involved in setting up UBank, which was Australia’s first digital bank.

Then just last week, Tyro announced it had recruited PayPal executive Kareem Al-Bassam for the newly created position of head of product.

The startup currently serves more than 16,000 small businesses, and Stollman is ranked number 21 in the Business Insider Tech 100 for leading the firm to a 2016 financial year that saw it harvest $95 million of revenue and crunch through $8.6 billion of transactions. He remains an executive director and the largest shareholder in the company.

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