A History Of People On Wall Street Swearing Their A$$es Off -- Even Buffett

warren buffett

Now that Goldman is wasting their Partners’ time by making them email anyone who write or even replies (sans swear word) to an email with a harmless little “WTF” in it, we decided to create a public display of people on Wall Street using swear words like they’re part of their daily lexicon.

Because they ARE a part of nearly everyone’s daily vocabulary. So, because:

1) someone at Goldman got his or her panties in a twist when their “shitty deal,” email went viral, and is now insisting that Partners, VPs, Managing Directors – everyone at Goldman – waste their time, stop their train of thought, and fart it up with nicer words that feel unnatural and nobody really uses, and 2) that is ridiculous (much like the upcoming slideshow) and 3) the senate would have been just as furious if instead of “shitty deal,” “this is not a good deal” had been written, we’ve created a slideshow of swearing by “role models” like Gary Cohn and Jamie Dimon on Wall Street.

To prove how misguided Goldman’s ban on swearing is,

At the height of the wrangling over financial regulatory reform legislation, Dimon grew so exasperated about the plethora of tough new amendments that he screamed at JPMorgan's lobbyists in DC: 'What the fuck are you guys doing for us! You guys are worthless!'

Source: HuffPo

Hedge fund manager Richard Grubman once aggressively questioned Enron's balance sheet disclosure during an analyst conference call. The questions were so pointed that Jeff Skilling responded by calling Grubman an 'arsehole' on the open line.'

Source

When it was time for Lehman managing director Kevin White to leave Dick Fuld's office, Fuld stood up and came around to the other side of his desk to shake White's hand. He put his hand out, then pulled it back. 'Nah, fuck that,' he said. 'Give me a hug. I need a hug.'

Source: Fortune

'You do things when the opportunities come along. I've had periods in my life when I've had a bundle of ideals come along, and I've had long dry spells. If I get an ideal next week, I'll do something. If not, I won't do a damn thing.'
-- Warren Buffett

Goldman COO Gary Cohn once cornered Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid at a fundraiser at Goldman's headquarters in Manhattan: 'Who do you think you are, coming here asking for money while you trash us?' Reid sat back and took the abuse, even as Cohn shouted, 'We're getting sick of the bullshit!'

Source: HuffPo

Blackstone chairman Steve Schwarzman's aide came back from a strategy session at John McCain's campaign headquarters in 2008, Schwarzman snapped: 'These guys couldn't give a shit about what we think.'

Source: HuffPo

When Mack and Blankfein tried flying commercial to a meeting at the White House but got stuck in fog at airports in New York and had to take part by conference call, Jamie Dimon had no such problems. He didn't mind the populist outrage over bankers flying corporate jets and was comfortable with taking JPMorgan's plane to Washington. 'Fuck it, that's why we have the jet in the first place.'

Source: HuffPo

Morgan Stanley executive Tom Nides was once told by an exhausted John Mack, 'People just fucking hate us.'

Source: HuffPo

Paulson apparently said British Chancellor Alistair Darling had 'grin-f---ed' the United States by not agreeing to allow Barclay's to buy Lehman Brothers,

- 'Too Big to Fail'

Public outrage at Wall Street was growing because 'your friends are fucking us,' said John Mack, referring to Morgan Stanley executive John Nides's friends in the White House and Democratic Party.

Source: HuffPo

Most people would agree that this is a pretty lame swear, sure. But for others, it's taking God's name in vain, and that is a sin.

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