BOOZE, STRIPPERS, AND GADGETS: One Day In The Life Of A Tech Blogger At CES

iheartradio models

Photo: Steve Kovach, Business Insider

I’m tired.Like really, really tired. I have dark circles under my eyes. I’m hungover. My colleague Ellis and I have resorted to communicating with grunts and half-completed sentences.

I’ve been in Las Vegas at the Consumer Electronics Show since Sunday. It’s been nonstop writing, meeting with tech big-wigs, and attending parties and dinners. I know it sounds fun. It is.

But it’s also insanely exhausting. I haven’t slept more than 5 hours any of the nights I’ve been here. 

Still, I’m glad I did it.

If you want to get a taste of what it’s like to cover CES, keep reading to see what a typical day.

Good morning! It's 6 a.m. I'm staying at the Luxor which has not one, but TWO Starbucks shops. Both are within visual distance of each other.

After grabbing coffee and a croissant it's time to get on the free shuttle that goes to the Las Vegas convention centre. It comes every 20 minutes, and is always packed with journalists, analysts, exhibitors, etc.

By the way, the Luxor knows which of its guests are attending CES. We each get this giant magazine with the day's highlights waiting at the door of our hotel rooms.

Sometimes you get shafted and have to sit outside in an open air shuttle bus. It may be Vegas, but it's still winter. The ride was FREEZING.

Vegas traffic stinks, so it takes about 20 minutes to get to the convention centre. Samsung has ads for its Galaxy note plastered everywhere.

Time for a booth tour! My first stop was Sony. The booth is usually mobbed, so I made sure to get there super early to beat the crowds. It was worth it.

Keynotes are a real pain to cover. I had to wait in a massive line just to get into Samsung's. Luckily one of Samsung's people saw my name tag and let me skip the line. Even with VIP treatment, I still couldn't find a seat. I blogged the whole thing from the grimy floor.

After touring the floor for a bit, it's off to the press room to file stories. The room has plenty of couches, free Wi-Fi, Starbucks coffee, tables, snacks, charging stations, you name it. It's almost always packed, so you really have to fight for a spot.

(This is the press room at the Venetian. I was here on Day 1 covering all the big keynotes. It's not uncommon to find other bloggers sleeping like this)

Lunch is a BIG DEAL for the press at CES. The media get free lunch at 11:30 a.m. The line starts forming around 11. Here you can see a bunch of convention centre employees stacking the boxed lunches.

I was lucky and only had to wait about 10 minutes for my free food. The line moves pretty quickly.

This is the meal ticket. You get one for every day of the convention.

Here's the mob of reporters eating their lunch.

The press room filled up, so these poor people had to eat their lunch on the floor in the hall.

I meant to take a photo of my lunch, but I was so hungry that I housed the whole thing. Here's the aftermath.

Speaking of food, this Ben & Jerry's stand outside the press room was a huge hit. There was always a line.

After lunch and some more writing, it's back to the show floor. But first, another Starbucks run. The Starbucks at the convention centre's main concourse always has a massive line.

Walking the floor during peak hours is really, really annoying. It's as if people turn their brains off as soon as they enter the building. Everyone is gawking and staring and not paying attention to where they're going. It took me forever to plow through this crowd of people looking at a 3D TV demo from LG.

The show ends at 6:30 p.m. each day. After that people run off to parties, open bars, dinners, etc. The shuttle line outside is nuts. It took me 20 minutes to get on my bus to the Venetian. I was almost late to my dinner with Sony.

Sony was kind enough to invite me to a nice dinner at the Canaletto Italian restaurant at the Venetian. Here's a shot of a bunch of other media and Sony bigwigs having drinks before the food was served. I had a monster steak. It was incredible.

After dinner I ran across the street to the Mirage to check out Mashable's party at the Haze nightclub. It was packed.

They were giving out free CDs at the DJ booth. Not sure why people were going so nuts over them.

The crowd was pretty mixed.

There was Guitar Hero on a huge display for anyone to play. (Correct me if I'm wrong. It could be Rock Band or something else.)

The cocktail waitresses' dresses were...revealing. But this is nothing compared to what I was going to see at the next party!

I started to get bored as soon as foam fell from the ceiling. What is this, college?

But first, I had to snap a photo of this guy. CRAZY THEORY: It's Pete Cashmore's younger brother. If it isn't, he's an idiot for not telling everyone he is.

Off to the next party! iHeartRadio, which is owned by Clear Channel, was sponsoring an event at the Haze club at the Aria hotel. was the DJ. But I had no clue what I was actually in for...

When I entered the Haze I saw these ladies in this glass booth. They stayed there all night striking weird poses.

And then came the dance floor. There were a ton of dancers on stage surrounding Fun fact: this dancer was wearing more clothes than many of her colleagues.

See what I mean?

Ellis and I got invited to this VIP booth. The waitress on the left is in a Vegas-wide contest for the hottest waitress in the city. She told me to vote for her, but I forgot her name. Oh well.

Now, more dancers...

The dance floor got crazy once took the stage.

For some reason, a bunch of Japanese executives from Toyota joined our VIP booth. Long story short, we did not get along, so I left the booth and went to the dance floor.

This is seriously the best shot of I could get. Unfortunately, my iPhone's battery died after this. Just know there were a lot more strippers at the show. Oh yeah, there was also a giant dancing robot. I didn't leave until 3 a.m.

Here's what I looked like the morning after. Needless to say, today was pretty rough.

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