80 Tons Of Metal are Still Dangling 1,000 Feet Over Manhattan

With Sandy gone, and the worst of the damage assessed, all eyes are looking up to the twisted crane atop One57 — 1,000 feet above the ground.

Mayor Bloomberg in his press conference yesterday promised that experts would strap the crane to the adjoining building at the first opportunity. Bloomberg insisted this would make the crane a “non-issue” and allow the city to wait for experts that could properly remove and replace it. 

The New York Times reports a “double gust” of wind twisted the crane backward from its unique hurricane ready position and sent it to its current condition.

Channel 4 reports it could take four to six weeks for another tower crane to be raised and bring the broken crane down. In the meantime local residents and workers have been evacuated, and steam lines beneath the street shut down.

The following pictures were taken Tuesday as the wind blew and rain fell. If anyone has a suggestion of a spot to shoot pictures at height, from a local building that has upper access, please shoot me an email and I’ll head over there when workers attempt to strap the crane to One57’s frame.

One 57 Crane

Photo: Robert Johnson

One57 Crane

Photo: Robert Johnson

One57 Crane

Photo: Robert Johnson

One57 Crane

Photo: Robert Johnson

One57 Crane

Photo: Robert Johnson

Don’t Miss: Our full on the ground coverage of Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath >

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