5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

US President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump walk in front of an F-35 fighter jet. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Here’s the top tech news for Thursday:

1. A hacker stole 30GB of Australian military data. Staff at the ASD, a government infosec intelligence agency named the intruder ‘Alf’ after the long-running Home & Away character. But Alf’s acts were not so amusing, grabbing commercially sensitive data about fighter jets and surveillance planes from a defence subcontractor. Read more here.

2. NAB customers were left stranded again. The online portal for business clients went down yesterday and stayed out of action for most of the day, as the bank faced a social media backlash from customers who couldn’t pay their staff or suppliers. Read more.

3. The competition watchdog questioned whether the NBN really took retailers’ concerns seriously. ACCC commissioner Rod Sims, according to the AFR, was surprised the NBN ruled out cuts to its wholesale pricing, which is currently causing great angst among retailers because it’s not as competitive as the old ways of connecting broadband.

4. Atlassian will turn its Sydney headquarters into a giant rainbow. The Australian tech giant will come out in support of the “yes” vote for the national same sex marriage survey by projecting a series of massive rainbow light designs onto its building from tonight. Read more on the company’s motivation.

5. The Business Insider Tech 100 is back! Nominations are now open for the most prestigious honour roll in Australian tech. If you know of a person who has created waves this year, please nominate them now. More info here.

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