5 Things You Need To Know In Australian Tech Today

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

It’s Wednesday, here’s what you need to know.

1. Uber is an unstoppable force. Despite dealing with PR nightmares over the past couple of the months, the company is still forging on. Just last week, Uber announced the company had raised $US1.2 billion in funding at a $US41 billion valuation. Since launching in 2010, Uber has raised a $US2.7 billion. It’s closest competitor, Lyft, has raised $US332.5 million. Here’s where Uber operates and where it’s banned.

2. Facebook and YouTube account for almost 40% of all mobile internet traffic. While that stat is based on North American usage for the month of September, it’s a trend which shouldn’t be dismissed in the Australian market. The chart is here.

3. A guy who sold his startup for $200 million has some simple advice for founders and it’s pretty simple: Just stay alive. If you can stay afloat long enough you may be able to get enough traction and outlast a competitor. There’s more here.

4. Google isn’t just a search engine. The tech giant and an autism research group have launched a new program to help scientists come up with new treatment options. The findings will be freely available to other scientists in an open database. More here.

5. Automation and robots aren’t just replacing low-skilled jobs. The Federal Government has released its 2014 Industry Report which stated robotic advancements are increasingly replicating tasks of medium and higher-skilled workers. The bonus is tech advancements should result in higher productivity which will lower the cost of goods. You can read the full report from Australia’s chief economist Mark Cully here.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter. @alexandraheber

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