5 Things You Need To Know In Australian Tech Today

Spotify’s CEO has spoken out about Taylor Swift pulling her songs from the music streaming platform. Photo: Getty

Welcome to Wednesday. Here’s what you need to know.

1. Hold onto your hat, the Internet of Things has landed. New Gartner research expects that in 2015 4.9 billion connected “things” will be in use, up 30% from 2014. It’s a concept big tech companies have been throwing a bunch of coin at, and trying to label it as their own, for some time — and rightly so, it’s estimated by 2019 the total economic impact of IoT will be $US1.7 trillion globally. All the details are here.

2. Spotify CEO put Taylor Swift in her place. In a blog post Daniel Ek said Swift was likely to get $6 million from the music streaming service this year and if it didn’t exist she’d get zilch. Ek’s full blog post is here.

3. Making running at night safer is what Nightro Athletic, a Sydney-based wearables co is hoping to achieve through the development of its LED sportswear. The startup has launched a KickStarter campaign to get off the ground with a $40,000 goal. It’s raised $6,200 from 61 backers so far. More here.

4. There’s a startup aiming to help tradies get paid. Sydney-based CheckVault is a secure payment service which takes the risk out of getting paid for a job for both parties by offering a secure escrow service through ANZ. Once a quote for a job is submitted, payments are secured and the funds aren’t released until both parties are satisfied.

5. Bitcoin is worth $1 million. That’s what Raoul Pal, a former global macro fund manager, thinks anyway. He compares the cryptocurrency to gold because there’s a finite amount of it. His analysis and explanation is all here.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter. @alexandraheber

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