5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Like a Twitter boss. Shark Tank judge Steve Baxter has changed his number plates to his Twitter handle.

Breathe out, it’s Friday. Here’s what you need to in Australian tech today.

1. Revenue per employee charts are a fascinating way to judge the health of tech companies. They show whether a company is growing the business by upping its headcount or whether it’s stagnating. Here are some charts on some big name tech companies.

2. Next on Netflix: GST. Treasurer Joe Hockey yesterday said he plans to redouble his efforts to charge GST on online purchases under $1000. The revelation came after a meeting with state treasurers on Thursday who were concerned that huge amounts of revenue was being lost with international media companies like Netflix and Apple not having to charge the tax. More here.

2. Queenslanders love their personalised number plates, and Shark Tank judge Steve Baxter is no different. He recently got his Twitter handle @sbxr punched into his plates on his Chrysler. He admits, he’s finally embraced Twitter. Yep, we think so too.

3. Centrelink is getting a new computer! The federal government will spend $1 billion over seven years to replace the welfare agency’s 1980-esque system which handles $100 billion worth of payments to 7.3 million people a year. The existing system has previously been described by Human Services Minister Marise Payne as like “running a turbo-charged Commodore 64 with air dams and a spoiler in the age of the iPhone”. There’s more here.

5. Vodafone has teamed up with Australian streaming platform Stan to give its customers free three month subscriptions. The partnership means millions of Vodafone customers will be able to stream Stan’s library for free on their mobile devices.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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