5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Photo: David Ramos/Getty Images.

Here’s the top tech news this morning:

1. Australians are loving the gig economy. And it’s baby boomers leading the way, rather than the tech-savvy younger folk. Latest research has found that those who choose to work in the gig economy – like Uber driving – for lifestyle reasons especially love it, while those forced into it are not as satisfied. Read more here.

2. A Sydney man gave free Foxtel to more than 8000 people. Haidar Baghdadi was found guilty and sentenced to an 18 months suspended jail term for his part in “an organised criminal network” that stole pay television content. Read more here.

3. Internet Australia chief executive Laurie Patton has been criticised by the vice-chairman of his own web user advocacy organisation. The Australian reports that Patton, who has been a vocal public critic of the NBN and the coalition’s abandonment of fibre-to-the-premises technology, was given a dressing down by vice-chairman and founder Paul Brooks for causing reputational harm to the organisation with “misinformed” statements to the public.

4. As the NBN rolls out, complaints to the ombudsman have hit an all-time high. CRN reports Telstra and Optus have blamed the NBN for their high rate of complaints to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman. The development comes after the NBN chief Bill Morrow last week blamed the customer satisfaction woes on a “land grab” by the retail internet providers.

5. A US university has created a prototype for a mobile phone with no battery. Reuters reports the device harvests power from all the radio frequency waves present in the air, with researchers hoping it will one day be commercialised to allow people to make calls even when their battery is flat.

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