5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Newzulu founder Alexander Hartman.

It’s Tuesday and there’s a lot happening. Here’s just what you need to know in Australian tech today.

1. Samsung has warned people about discussing ‘sensitive information’ in front of their SmartTV. The new TV has a voice-command feature which the internet-connected device could record everything you say and transmit it to a third party. There’s a warning hidden deep inside Samsung’s “privacy policy” which reads: “Please be aware that if your spoken words include personal or other sensitive information, that information will be among the data captured and transmitted to a third party.” More here.

2. Biotech company Vaxxas just raised $25 million in series B funding taking the total raised to $40 million. The company will use the funds to push the development of its needle-free vaccination technology. More here.

3. Home delivered meal-kit company HelloFresh has raised $161 million from Rocket Internet and Insight Venture Partners. The latest round of funding adds to a total of nearly $200 million raised by the company. More here.

4. Newzulu, Australian startup and crowdsourced media company, today completed the acquisition of Filemobile, a Toronto-based user-generated content marketing software company for about $5.06 million. More here.

5. Tall poppies killing VC? Labor MP Ed Husic has written a piece in the AFR which quoted a San Fran based VC saying “don’t expect to see an Australian-based venture capital fund operating in five years’ time,” a comment which was followed up with, “And you can thank your tall poppy syndrome for that. You don’t value success enough and you don’t risk much to get it.” The full piece is here and it’s worth a careful read.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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