5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

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Morning all, here’s what you need to know in Australian tech today.

1. Australian pirates watch out! Rightscorp, an American company that specialises in monitoring and sending letters to internet pirates has filed for an Australia patent. Rightscorp is known for its investigations of BitTorrent and other peer to peer networks. It sends notices to internet services providers, threatening penalties of up to $150,000. In reality, users are able to settle for as little as $20.

2. Malcolm Turnbull could be putting classified information at risk. The new Prime Minister is still using a non-governmental email account/ service, potentially putting sensitive information at risk of hackers or foreign surveillance. Read more here.

3. Australia is trailing in the race to go cashless. Even though Australia leads the world in owning contactless credit and debit cards, only 35% of all consumer transactions are cashless. And it could be costing the economy billions.

4. A startup to help startups has listed on the ASX. iBosses, a company that trains entrepreneurs has listed on the ASX. It plans to use the cash to expand its online offerings. Chris Pash has more.

5. A hackathon to “disrupt” Canberra. Assistant innovation minister Wyatt Roy and startup accelerator Blue Chilli are teaming up for a “policy hackathon”. “Everything is on the table” for the one day event to spur innovation.

Bonus item: Rupert Murdoch has been humbled by Twitter. Rupert Murdoch is a strong supporter of Ben Carson in the race to be the Republican Nominee for President. Now, the former Australian has apologised after one of his tweets seemed to imply President Obama wasn’t a “real black”.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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