5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Jarryd Hayne playing for the NRL’s Gold Coast Titans. (Source: Getty)

Welcome to Tuesday! Here are the tech stories that you need to bone up on this afternoon:

1. Do you know your current financial health? Didn’t think so. A couple of Brisbane finance experts have launched an app that will show you in one graph how you’re doing and where you’re going. It was developed for folks approaching retirement, but has proven to be useful for younger types. After all, saving for a house in Sydney is pretty much like saving for retirement, right?

2. NRL star and former NFL player Jarryd Hayne had images of topless women and “lewd acts” appear on an automated screen showing his browsing history. Hayne, as an ambassador for tech security company Norton, was hosting an event to demonstrate online safety to kids when the embarrassing breach occurred. Read more on how Norton explained the bizarre incident.

3. Hate drones? Here’s the answer. ASX-listed company Droneshield has developed anti-drone technology for those concerned about privacy breaches from those ever-present machines. Read more on how they work.

4. Online retailer Android Enjoyed is league leader in customer complaints. CRN reports that the website was the subject of the most number of complaints to NSW Fair Trading in the August-September period. This finding came two months after the government agency warned consumers not to shop there.

5. Tesco Bank in the UK has frozen all online transactions after money was reportedly stolen from 20,000 accounts over the weekend. Read more on the developing story here.

Have a great day! Please email me your story tips or find me on Twitter.

NOW WATCH: Tech Insider videos

Want to read a more in-depth view on the trends influencing Australian business and the global economy? BI / Research is designed to help executives and industry leaders understand the major challenges and opportunities for industry, technology, strategy and the economy in the future. Sign up for free at research.businessinsider.com.au.