5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Google Australia MD Maile Carnegie.

It’s Wednesday. Here’s what you need to know in Australian tech today.

1. Today the heads of Australia’s big multinationals will be grilled about how much tax they pay. Google Australia MD Maile Carnegie will present the company’s case at 1.30pm today. Microsoft and Apple will follow shortly after. Here’s what they’re expected to say. We’ll have updates throughout the day.

2. You could get a letter if you are one of the almost 5,000 Australian “movie pirates” about to have their details handed to the film makers of Dallas Buyers Club. The filmmaker won its copyright battle against iiNet and other Australian internet service providers, with the Federal Court on Tuesday. It’s not yet clear what demands – if any – they might make. Full story is here.

3. Liftoff?! Optus has reportedly had an informal chat with Elon Musk’s space tech company SpaceX about using its rockets to launch a new satellite into orbit. The Australian reports the telco plans to launch another satelite in 2018, taking its count to 7, but it will need a launch partner. Full story is here.

4. There are now 13 million Australians active on Facebook each month and they’re some of the heaviest users in the world. The average time Australians spend on Facebook every day is 1.7 hours. That’s a lot of stalking. These incredible stats show exactly how huge the social network is Down Under.

5. Globally, Facebook estimates one in every three minutes spent on a mobile is on a property the company owns. With such a captured audience, there are plenty of user insights to learn from. Here’s how Facebook thinks Australians use their mobiles.

Have an awesome day! I’m on Twitter.

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