5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Navya autonomous taxi cab. (Source: Navya)

Here’s what you need to know in tech today.

1. Australian businesses will have to fend for themselves against Amazon. The head of the ACCC has said Amazon coming to Australia is good for consumers and he has no intent on stopping them — even if it means local rivals are put under pressure. Read more here.

2. Amazon has already been running a profitable business in Australia for years. The US giant’s cloud computing department has globally made more money than the retail business in the past five quarters. This is why businesses in this country love it and the average Australian has probably used Amazon’s technology without even realising.

3. Western Australia will have autonomous taxis running next year. iTnews reports the WA Royal Automobile Club will trial self-driving cabs from April, with Perth becoming one of just three cities in the world to test the new French cars. The same company, Navya, is also providing the vehicles for a driverless bus trial in that state.

4. What does a typical Australian startup look like? Here’s the profile, as revealed in StartupAus’ annual Crossroads report. Fifty-seven percent of startups were established by first or second generation immigrants and 76% of them have at least one founder with a previous business.

5. Australia has lost ground internationally because of the tightening of skilled immigration rules. A record $1.32 billion was raised in venture capital in 2017, showing a maturing industry – but the migration changes have made it difficult to take the next step. Read more.

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