5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Bastian Lehmann, Postmates CEO

1. Alphatise has been sold. You may remember the Sydney startup plunged into administration earlier this year. Deloitte has been running an expression of interest process in an attempt to sell Alphatise as a going concern since March but it only received one offer. That offer was a recapitalisation proposal from former director Paul Pearson. Pearson failed to raise the nearly $2 million but with no other offers on the table Deloitte sold the company to his Alphatise Australia outfit. There’s more here.

2. Facebook’s Australian boss is moving up the ranks. Will Easton is off to head up the social media company’s APAC emerging markets operations from Singapore. Full story is here.

3. Coffee ordering app Beat the Q is changing its name. After merging with fellow ordering app Posse last year, the company said it’s going to rebrand and there’ll be some changes to the product too.

4. On-demand courier startup Zoom2u has raised $850,000 to expand throughout Australia. After launching back in November, the company now provides a three hour service to customers in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. The round was led by Temando non-executive director and Ellerston Capital advisory board member Anthony Klok. On-demand delivery is an increasingly crowded space around the world. Just last week, US on-demand delivery service Postmates raised $US80 million at a $US400 million valuation.

5. The energy city. Sydney startup Wattblock is in the middle of a capital raise but it has landed a contract with the City of Sydney to conduct energy assessments of buildings and develop apartment building benchmarks.

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