5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Stratolaunch. (Source: supplied)

Huzzah, it’s Friday! Check out these tech stories before you enjoy the weekend:

1. Phil Morle founded Australia first startup incubator in 2007 then decided to shut it down this year. He now explains the heartbreaking decisions behind Pollenizer’s demise as a warning to current entrepreneurs. Read more on what he describes as one of the worst days of his life.

2. Australia’s mobile broadband is the fastest in Asia-Pacific again. The latest quarterly Akamai report shows the average mobile of 15.7Mbps is comfortably faster than landline, which is clocking in at 11.1Mbps. The non-mobile internet speed has improved though, meaning Australia snuck into 50th place, still behind Kenya, Thailand and… New Zealand. Read more on the state of our broadband against the rest of the world.

3. IBM’s artificial intelligence machine Watson is fighting cancer. A Queensland oncology network will start using the cognitive computing platform to provide access to the latest global research for seven different cancer types: breast, lung, colorectal, gastric, cervical, prostate and ovarian cancer. Read more here.

4. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen just built the world’s biggest plane. His satellite launch company Stratolaunch unveiled its monstrous aircraft in California overnight, with an aim to launch satellites into orbit. Check out the pictures of the 227,000kg, 28-wheel monster with a 117m wingspan here.

5. Have you ever just nodded at your cybersecurity expert without having the faintest clue what she or he was talking about? Here are 29 tech security buzzwords you should know. You’re welcome.

Have a great day! Please email me your story tips or find me on Twitter.

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