5 things you need to know in Australian tech today

Waymo’s driverless car. (Source: Alphabet/Google/Waymo)

Here are the tech stories making headlines to start this week:

1. Australia could save $33 billion per year if driverless cars were introduced. Fleet management broker GPS came up with the number after crunching data from various sources to see how much GDP various countries lose to road accidents. Read more here.

2. FitBit for dogs has arrived in Australia. The AFR reports that pet insurer PetSure is importing FitBarks into the country after seeing a spike in obesity and diabetes-related claims in the last couple of years. Read more on how the typical lifestyle of a suburban canine has changed in recent times.

3. Australia’s largest venture fund AirTree has recruited two high-powered Silicon Valley execs. TechCrunch reports former Accel Partners guru James Cameron and former CoveredCo founder Julia French have joined AirTree, which last year closed a new $250 million fund.

4. Here’s how to turn old mobile phones into food. Electronic recycling organisation MobileMuster and surplus food charity OzHarvest have announced that for each phone handed in until the end of February, one meal would be donated for an Australian in need. Read more on the great cause here.

5. Victoria’s Independent Broad-based Commission Against Corruption has found the state’s failed education department tech project was rife with corruption. iTnews reports that criminal charges could be laid against those involved with the Ultranet tender, which the IBAC claims was a “boys’ club” designed to line personal pockets with public money.

Have a great day! Please email me your story tips or find me on Twitter.

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